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Hard Drive failure - how did this happen?

Okay, this is one of the strangest things I've seen, and was wondering if anyone knows how this might have happened.

I have a client that is a small business with one Windows 2000 Server (with mirrored IDE hard drives) and seven workstations.  When they left Friday evening, everything was fine.  When one of the partners came in Saturday, his computer wasn't working and neither was the server and some of the other workstations.  When I got there, I discovered that in all cases it was due to a hard drive failure.  This includes BOTH of the drives in the server.

I'm not talking about lost data here.  These drives all were completely dead to the point where the system would not even detect them, and most would "click" very loudly when the systems were turned on.

Every computer is on at least a surge suppressor, and most have UPSs (including, of course, the server), but the only thing I can think of to explain this is some sort of power event.

There were workers on their floor working on a new suite across the hall, so it's definitely possible that something might have happened to the electricty on this floor.  But, what would cause all of the hard drives to crash (and why just the hard drives and not, say, the power supplies and system boards?)

Any explaination to what might have happened would be appreciated.

Thanks,
GHK
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phan71
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phan71
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2 Solutions
 
Pete LongTechnical ConsultantCommented:
I think youve allready answered the Q - in this case Id say Power surge/spike - UPS or not a big bolt can beat the "Clamping TIme" thats set on these devices so they cut the power too late, they are a sensible precaution but not a "Protect All" plus a but power surge on a client PC can get at the network ov3er Cat5 - these are not usually protected by surge suppressors :(
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jbedwar1Commented:
are the computers left on all the time??? Check the system logs on some of the computers that are still working to see if anything strange occured during the night.  Have you tried hooking any of the drives up as a slave to another computer just to see if they are accessible in any way?
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CallandorCommented:
I agree - a power spike can knock out some components and not others, though I would be wary of the systems and watch for future failures.  It is always a good idea to take preventive measures if you know people are going to be doing construction work nearby, because they use power tools that really generate spikes and electrical noise.
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phan71Author Commented:
jbedwar1:

Unfortunately, the only systems that were affected were the ones that were left on over night.  The other systems wouldn't have logged anything.

I haven't gotten a chance to hook bad drives up for testing, but like I said, they're not even seen by the BIOS.
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jbedwar1Commented:
if they were the only ones on...then there is no doubt that there was a major power surge.  
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rustyrpageCommented:
Have you checked with anyone else in the building to see if anyone else is having similar computer problems?  
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phan71Author Commented:
I did have them call some people and check.  No one else had any problems.  But, the floor that they are on is newly renovated, and they are the only tennants currently on that floor.  Since this is an older building, I'm pretty sure that the electrical wiring on this floor is new, and not part of the rest of the building's (older) electrical wiring.
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jbedwar1Commented:
any clocks in the building that lost their power and had to be reset?  Any other way of teling if he power surged or such??  Still sounds like you already knew the answer to your question so i'm not sure what kind of closure ur looking for.  
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rustyrpageCommented:
Yeah, sounds like a bummer....did you have good backups?
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phan71Author Commented:
The server did.  Luckily, they're pretty good about storing stuff on the server and not locally.
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rustyrpageCommented:
So now it's just the fun task of rebuilding all the computers...at least all you need is new drives
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nobusCommented:
I think the logic boards took a spike; so if you want to try to recover them, you can buy the same HDD and replace the logic board.
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JohnnyCanuckCommented:
Just curious.  Were these Fujitsu drives?
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phan71Author Commented:
Actually, they were all Western Digital
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Pete LongTechnical ConsultantCommented:
ThanQ
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