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DVD Burning software...

I am relatively new to this site as well as the Mac.  I have a Powerbook G4 1.25MhZ with a SuperDrive.  I am trying to find software that will convert & burn mpeg & avi files to a DVD ready for home use.  I have found some programs that convert the files, but only demos; am I going to have to buy a program?  Any reccomendations are welcome.....   Thanks in advance
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Ioannes-Gill
Asked:
Ioannes-Gill
1 Solution
 
weedCommented:
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Andrew DuffyTechnical Services CoordinatorCommented:
iDVD which comes as part of Apple's (rather inexpensive) iLife suite of programs, is a good consumer-level DVD authoring tool:

http://www.apple.com/ilife/idvd/

The package is available for $49 from the Apple Store, although your local Mac retailer should have copies too.
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marcmitcCommented:
QuickTime may not be able to play back some MPEG's and .avi's, depending on how they were originally encoded. You may need to (gulp) install Windows Media Player (free) and DIVX (free) to get the codecs (encoders/decoders) for QuickTime to be able tp play the files. If QuickTime cannot play the files, then iDVD or Toast will not be able to encode and burn the files. You should also look into QuickTime Pro ($30), which will allow you more import/export options. QuickTime Pro is basically a serial number, which enables many more functions within QuickTime. You simply enter the serial number in QuickTime's preferences to unlock the features.
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Scorp888Commented:
Even with Quick Time Pro, you may not be able to still view some files.

Windows Media Player it better than quicktim, and VLC, is beeter than both.
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Andrew DuffyTechnical Services CoordinatorCommented:
I hadn't thought about the process before rendering the video and these are all good points. If you have video that hasn't been captured on the Mac and therefore may be in an incompatible format, you'd probably be better off using a PC to make sure any existing footage you have is compatible. You'll then have a point to move on from.
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Ioannes-GillAuthor Commented:
I have some avi files that will only play on MPlayer, other than that the rest are mpeg.  I am using IVCD to convert the files, however, it is damn slow at conversion.  It seems to be doing the job though.  Most of the programs that were mentioned required an mpeg2 stream or file,or a disk image, yet I don't know what to use to convert my avi/mpeg files to this format.  
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weedCommented:
There's no reason to use a PC for this. There is no media, aside from the latest WMV codecs (which nobody should be using anyway, and is difficult to convert from even on a PC) that you cant use on a Mac.

Toast should take care of most of your media, and anything else can be converted with QuickTime Pro, as long as you have DivX, 3ivx, and MPEG-2 codecs installed.
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adidas9093Commented:
I don't know if this will help. We used "mactheripper" software to rip the software and then write to DVD, but it only worked on a G5 1.8Ghz machine.
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