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so Applets can't access the users hard drive...

can they access and manipulate files on the web server?

Thanks
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dds110
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dds110
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CEHJCommented:
They can read them, but not write them unless there is a server-based mechanism to allow it (e.g. FTP)
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dds110Author Commented:
hey cehj

well !@#$

is there no easy way of running a java application on the web server?  Without having to download, install, and configure a bunch of other !@#$?

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sudhakar_koundinyaCommented:
concepts like RMI will help you to access and modify the webserver files from applets
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CEHJCommented:
>>is there no easy way of running a java application on the web server?

Not really - webservers are designed to server web pages ;-) Application servers are to run binaries (Tomcat, JBoss etc)
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sudhakar_koundinyaCommented:
if you implement Applet as RMI client and RMI Server installed at webserver, then whenever rmi client request for modification of file or something else, rmi server should take care of that and do the related changes

regards
sudhakar
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gdrnecCommented:
Actually, there is a happy medium that requires only the installation of a JRE (a simple enough task). That medium is JNLP (Java Network Launch Protocol or WebStart). This allows you to distribute full blown applications that can have access to the user's hard drive and resources. Nice thing about JNLP is its versioning that allows the distributor to continually update the code without having any client side issues. It also allows the specification of a JRE version for compatibilty.

Maybe an alternative? I use it alot because of its flexibility.

Geoff
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dds110Author Commented:
whoa...

slow down guys, i'm still a bit wet behind the ears when it comes to java to begin with.  All day I've been writing a "server utility" to "listen" to a file.

When the file changes, the "utility" kicks off my application (hopefully).

Everything mentioned here sounds good but...

Friday is my last working day in the civillian world.  My National Guard unit is being activated and I have to get this project done by Friday.  In other words, I don't have much time to "get into" a bunch of new stuff right now.
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gdrnecCommented:
Is it a client's (web client) responsibility to change the file that is being monitored? If so, you can always use an applet or a simple web page to talk to a servlet on a web server. That servlet can change files on the web server (but not the client).

Is this what you are looking for?
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dds110Author Commented:
I'm not sure gdrnec, but your last post sounds promising.

Yes, the client will be changing the file.  However, my web server is IIS 5.0 on a WinXP box.  I don't think I can run a servlet without installing and configuring some third party program.

Unless you know something I don't.
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gdrnecCommented:
Check out this link. It is a bit of work but nothing huge.

http://www.javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-06-2000/jw-0616-iis.html

At least it gets you across the hurdle.
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