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Need information on how to transition from an ISP hosted email service to local SBS2003 Exchange Server email service

Posted on 2004-09-29
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Last Modified: 2010-08-05
I have an ISP based email host and a registered domain name that I would like to convert over to the new SBS 2003 Exchange Server I'm putting online.

How do you get email to the new server instead of the ISPs? Or better yet, have the server interact with the ISP email host so the mail is on the web and the local server.

The SBS 2003 is set up with a name like mydomain.local name whereas the registered domain name is like mydomain.com. How does this get reconciled at the server level so mail and remote web services can find the server by name? Or is it better to use the sticky IP address instead?

Thanks,
Brian

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Question by:BrianEsser
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humeniuk earned 500 total points
ID: 12190291
An exchange server can be configured to accept mail from multiple domains.  See 'Configuring Exchange to Receive Mail from Multiple Domains' at http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;q268838.  Follow these steps and you'll be able to received mail to you@yourdomain.com (as well as internal mail to you@yourdomain.local, if you wish to).

However, you also have to set up public DNS for the domain that will forward mail traffic to your public IP address.  You need to configure your domain with your registrar to point to a specific DNS server.  On that DNS server, you need to create and MX (or mail exchange record) directing mail traffic to your public IP address.  If you don't have DNS service, you can take a look at www.zoneedit.com, a free DNS service.

For web or internet access, you can configure Exchange to use Outlook Web Access, essentially giving you webmail access to your server (see www.microsoft.com/exchange/owa).  You can also configure your server to work as a pop/smtp server via the internet.
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Author Comment

by:BrianEsser
ID: 12201133
Thanks for pointing me in the right direction.

Follow up question: Should I set up pop/smtp and why/not?

Thanks,
Brian
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LVL 33

Expert Comment

by:humeniuk
ID: 12201637
First, thanks for the A.

Whether you should set up pop/smtp depends on what policies you want to implement.  The primary benefit of pop/smtp, I suppose, is that remote users could connect from wherever they are, download their mail, and store it locally.  In most business cases, I would prefer to keep it on the server for the sake of security, centralized backup, etc.  The user could configure their client to leave a copy on the server, of course, but then you get into synchronization issues, etc.  If none of this is relevant to your circumstances, pop/smtp can be a convenient way to go.

On the other hand, OWA provides webmail access to the server that is comparable to using an integrated Exchange/Outlook setup.  It allows the user to access their email wherever there is web access instead of needing a computer with a configured client and keeps everything centralized in the Exchange server.
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Author Comment

by:BrianEsser
ID: 12201867
You're welcome.

Just the information I needed. I agree that because this is a business case we will want to keep it on the server and not leave it to chance with the user configuration using pop/smtp.

You were most helpful.

Thanks,
Brian
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LVL 33

Expert Comment

by:humeniuk
ID: 12202058
Glad to be of some help.  Good luck.
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Author Comment

by:BrianEsser
ID: 12256397
I'm still stuck!!!

Can someone please lend another hand...

http://www.experts-exchange.com/Networking/Email_Groupware/Q_21160625.html

Thanks,
Brian
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