IP address

I have a network with a 172.16.0. IP and subnet mask of 255.255.255.0.  I want to create a VPN to another network that has to be on a different subnet scheme.  Do do this I would think that 172.16.1. with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0
would this be the correct way to do this??
dtooth71Asked:
Who is Participating?

Improve company productivity with a Business Account.Sign Up

x
 
TRobertsonConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Yes that is ok, both of these are private subnets and perfect for your situation.
172.16.X.1-254
Longest you change the X and stay on 255.255.255.0 they will be different subnets and must pass through a gateway to connect to each other.
0
 
dtooth71Author Commented:
so I can make the X 172.16.X.1 any other number except the 0 that is on the current network??
0
 
dtooth71Author Commented:
and keep the subnet 255.255.255.0 the same
0
What Kind of Coding Program is Right for You?

There are many ways to learn to code these days. From coding bootcamps like Flatiron School to online courses to totally free beginner resources. The best way to learn to code depends on many factors, but the most important one is you. See what course is best for you.

 
TRobertsonCommented:
Yes, like you stated.  

Example:
172.16.0.x  255.255.255.0 subnet
device 1 172.16.0.1
device 2 172.16.0.2
device 3 172.16.0.3...
device 254 172.16.0.254

172.16.1.x 255.255.255.0 subnet
device 1 172.16.1.1
device 2 172.16.1.2
device 3 172.16.1.3...
device 254 172.16.1.254

172.16.2.x 255.255.255.0 subnet
device 1 172.16.2.1
device 2 172.16.2.2
device 3 172.16.2.3...
device 254 172.16.2.254


If you wanted to get complicated with the netmask and you could do something more complex like
172.16.0.x  netmask 255.255.255.128
network 1
172.16.0.1-172.16.0.126
network 2
172.16.0.129-172.16.0.254

However for simplicity i would stick with the first option.
checkout http://www.telusplanet.net/public/sparkman/netcalc.htm for subnet calculations
0
 
PennGwynCommented:
> so I can make the X 172.16.X.1 any other number except the 0 that is on the current network??

The 255.255.255.0 mask says that different X values designate different networks.  RFC 1918 says these are private ranges that you can use for this if X is in the range 16 through 31.  Other values of X are public ranges which probably already belong to somebody else.


0
 
friekedCommented:
Short answer to your question is yes, that is one correct way of picking a different subnet.
suggestion:  I have found it's good practice to keep your subnets more than 1 number away.  That way if you ever need to expand, then you have plenty of room.
For example if you pick subnets 172.16.0.0 and 172.16.1.0 it's possible that 3-4 years down the line after some expansions/mergers the 172.16.0.0 subnet could be filled and then you're faced with the headache of having to move your other subnet to make space.
Using a subnet mask of 255.255.255.128 as will make your subnets even smaller and isn't really necessary for most companies who use private address space since there's plenty of other subnets to go around.
Good idea would be to pick 172.16.0.0 and then maybe 172.16.128.0 or even 172.17.0.0
0
 
DiCeRCommented:
172.16.0.1-255/255.255.255.0 and 172.16.1.1-255/255.255.255.0 will indeed be two different networks.

However - you will not establish a VPN connection to a different network by merely defining the new network.

Since traffic gets routed through one or more devices on its way from one network to the other, the MAIN POINT of a VPN-connection is to have a secure tunnel through the one-or-more-devices your traffic passes through. This tunnel is trustworthy even if the devices the traffic passes through isnt.

You will still need dedicated software and/or hardware that can make a VPN-connection between these two networks.

If your only need is a connection between those two networks, you shouldnt complicate things with a secure tunnel, but focus on arranging for the routing between them to work.

Hope this helps
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.