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Linux Redhat 9.0 Installation (newbie)

Posted on 2004-09-30
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Hello ,

I have 2 scenarios I can do for these ideas,

Scenario 1
I want to install Linux Redhat 9.0 I got a copy of that today. I want to try it out and see what all the hype is about and it be nice to learn a new Operating system and not be confined to Microsoft domination. I have a few questions I need addressed and please as clearly as you can . My goal is to have a dual booting system that I can backup with Norton Ghost software I have System Works 2004 (got it for b-day). I just want enough to get me by because I dont want to waste any space since I was told Linux and windows xp dont like sharing the drive.

So how can I get a dual/booter system that can be backed up with norton ghost and how much space do i need for my hardrives .  Currently I have 2 hardrives ... 160 gig , and a 40 gig for Norton backup.

Can I have my windows in NTFS format still?   I will use Windows XP the most I just want linux to play around with to see if I like it and learn it .
Will they be able to share files ?
How many hardrives partions will I need to make and what ones?
Which OS do I install first?

Scenario 2.)
I have a extra computer around 300 mhz 128 mb computer .. maybe more ram cant remember now but winxp is on it and it runs nice.

Should I just install Linux on this computer and what version ?  I dont think redhat will work I think it might be to slow.  Hardrive is 10 or 20 gig dont remember at moment.

So as you can see I want to install a Linux but just caught on what to do.  Suggestions are greatly welcomed .

Thank you
NIGHTMAR3Z
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Question by:NIGHTMAR3Z
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liddler earned 125 total points
ID: 12190982
1) linux doesn't need a huge amount of disk, you'll get a full install in 5Gb, and a desktop in < 2Gb
have a look at http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/RHL-9-Manual/install-guide/
You can use ntfs, there is a kernel module that will read ntfs, but it's not on by default, I usually add a couple of GB FAT32 partition that they can both read.
Share files - as above
Partitions - Just give the install process a disk or empty partition and let it do the sizing and partitioning
First - XP then linux


2) Yes, redhat will run on it, it will be slow, but so will you if you are just learning ;-)
and you can trash it as many times as you like without worrying about you XP partition
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by:NIGHTMAR3Z
ID: 12192934

Ok , so far the information is helping alittle it seems I should just install it on my crappy machine just to get it running an to learn it .

I just heard I need like 3 partions and alot of other stuff about it I know how to install Windows and hardware and software for the Windows applications and servers but nothing about Linux .


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by:liddler
ID: 12195943
Yeah, you will usually use about three partitions, but the linux installer will sort it out for you
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by:NIGHTMAR3Z
ID: 12201219
How should I do the setup then ... if I want dual booting ?

Explain please ... lets say I will use winxp/ some kind of linux... I just found out friend gave me a DVD of it not CD so i cant install Redhat ... would mandrake 9 work?
or slackware... I just want something easy so I can learn it ... if they have a redhat I can download what is website looking for a free version.

I need partion information for dualbooting .. what do I install first?
say I have 20 gig hardrive how do I make it so I can have 1 drive that I can share files with windows?
what Linux package will allow the following...  NTFS and filesharing .

I decided i want it just enough to run and a drive where I can share the files for winxp and linux there that can be the bigest.  Yes I know alot of questions but I am getting alot of qustions popping up in my head want to make sure I set this up right for what I want .

Thank you
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by:liddler
ID: 12206322
Yes any linux distro, slackware, debian, suse, mandrake, etc
Rdhat doesn't exist anymore it's now called Fedora - download it at  http://fedora.redhat.com/download/
There is also a link to dual booting there.
Install windows first
I would create two partitions, say one of 10G for windows (NTFS), one 2G FAT32 for sharing, and leave the other 8G empty, and the linux installer will see that and install its partitions on it.
Fedora NTFS - http://linux-ntfs.sourceforge.net/rpm/fedora1.html
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by:NIGHTMAR3Z
ID: 12207022

Ok I understand thank you for the time and information.

Thank you lidder
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