Mounting an exisitng ext'd NFS partition

I've just recently re-installed FC2 and when re-creating the partitions I wanted to leave some data on /dev/hda5 an NFS partition, so I did not include it when re-formatting the other partitions. Now when I login to FC2 and try to mount /dev/hda5 "mount /dev/hda5 /video" I get the error "mount point /video does not exist".

I'm very new to FC2 and just am not sure exactly what's going on? How can I even tell if the partition is mounted? When using fdisk the partition is listed so I know it exists.

Thanks for any help you can give.

AJM,
LVL 8
ampapaAsked:
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jlevieCommented:
"mount point /video does not exist" simply says the the directory /video doesn't exist and thus the mount fails. The solution is to 'mkdir /video' and then execute 'mount /dev/hda5 /video'.

Once the mount point exists and you can manually mount the FS you can automate the process by adding:

/dev/hda5       /video         auto defaults  1 2

to /etc/fstab.
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ampapaAuthor Commented:
Here is the FDISK info:

Disk /dev/hda: 163.9 GB, 163928604672 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19929 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/hda1   *           1          13      104391   83  Linux
/dev/hda2              14        1318    10482412+  83  Linux
/dev/hda3            1319        1448     1044225   82  Linux swap
/dev/hda4            1449       19929   148448632+   f  W95 Ext'd (LBA)
/dev/hda5            1449       19929   148448601   83  Linux
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LuxanaCommented:
Hi

first have a look in /etc/fstab if you /dev/hda5 is not already mounted in some directory

to muout filesystem you need to create directory (mount point ) where you want to mount your filesystem

example:

mkdir /mnt/mypartition

then mout command:

mount /dev/hda5 /mnt/mypartition

to quick check your currently mountet filesystems you can also use

# mount


.....

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LuxanaCommented:
and I forgot :

command mount is using /etc/fstab in some way whne no mount points listetd in command .

example:

line in my /etc/fstab

/dev/cdrom      /cdrom          iso9660 ro,user,noauto          0       0

# mount /cdrom
or
# mount/cdrom

wil automaticaly mount cdrom to /cdrom

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ampapaAuthor Commented:
O.K.

So, once I've created the directory and mounted the drive I should be able to store data, etc. to the partition correct? Is this similar to "mapping" a drive in Windows?

In my /etc/fstab how do I know what parameters to use?

/dev/hda5       /video         auto defaults  1 2            <============ is this correct for my new mount?
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LuxanaCommented:
/dev/hda5       /video         auto defaults  1 2

is correct then you need to use command :

# mount -av

to mount this cahnges in /etc/fstab

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LuxanaCommented:
if not working instead auto use your type of filesytem on /dev/hda5
examle:

/dev/hda5       /video         ext2 defaults  1 2
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jlevieCommented:
> So, once I've created the directory and mounted the drive I should be able to store data, etc. to the partition
> correct?

Mounting assumes that some sort of supported file system exists on that partition (FAT/FAT32/EXT2/EXT3). Unless you have some specific requirment for the partition EXT3 is probably best. And from the way the question was phrased I assumed that this was the case and that there was probably data already on that partition. If this is not the case you'd want to execute 'mke2fs -j /dev/hda5' to create and EXT3 file system before attempting the mount.

Once the file system has been mounted it becomes accessible for reading/writing. You need to know that the permissions of the mount point govern permissions of the mounted file system. For example if /video is owned by root and has drwx------ only root would have access to the data. To allow all users full access to the data you'd want /video to have permissions of drwxrwxrwx.

> Is this similar to "mapping" a drive in Windows?

Somewhat. The big differences are that you get to specify the mount point, which can be anywhere in the Linux file system, and that ownership & permissions are a feature of the Linux file system rather than being something managed by the OS.
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ampapaAuthor Commented:
Here is the message I get.

# mount /dev/hda5 /video
# mount -av
mount: LABEL=/boot already mounted on /boot
mount: none already mounted on /dev/pts
mount: none already mounted on /dev/shm
mount: none already mounted on /proc
mount: none already mounted on /sys
nothing was mounted
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ampapaAuthor Commented:
Sorry I meant to also post the mount info.

# mount
/dev/hda2 on / type ext3 (rw)
none on /proc type proc (rw)
none on /sys type sysfs (rw)
none on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,gid=5,mode=620)
usbdevfs on /proc/bus/usb type usbdevfs (rw)
/dev/hda1 on /boot type ext3 (rw)
none on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw)
sunrpc on /var/lib/nfs/rpc_pipefs type rpc_pipefs (rw)
/dev/hda5 on /video type xfs (rw)
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LuxanaCommented:
command
# mount -av

look to your /etc/fstab and mount partition which are not mounted .

# mount gives you all pratitons wich are mounted
here you /dec/hda5 is mounted to /video - read and write

dev/hda5 on /video type xfs (rw)

you are now able to read and write your /dev/hda5  

also command
# df
gives you useful informations


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