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Disk is VERY slow

Posted on 2004-10-01
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Last Modified: 2007-11-27
WinXP machine hangs at boot time.  I moved the Seagate disk to another PC as slave and tried a Ghost backup - after running for 7 hours it was 9% completed.  Man, life's too short.  All ways to access the data seem to work but extreemly slowly.  What's up ?   I ran the Seagate diag and got the following result - what's it all mean ?   What does "DST Error Status 07" mean ?  Is there any way to salvage the data in a reasonable time frame ?
Thanks.

 SeaTools Desktop v3.00.07
 Copyright (c) 2004 Kroll Ontrack Inc.


 9/30/2004 @ 8:25 PM


 The following information has been generated by SeaTools Desktop.  Use
 this information to help you recognize and resolve potential data access
 problems.



 System Information:
 BIOS Date                 05/07/03
 Conventional Memory size   639 K
 Extended Memory size      58532 K
 IO Channel type            PCI




 Drive Information:
 SIZE         MODEL
 ---------    ---------------------
 80 GB        ST380020A



 Serial Number = 5GC0G06K
 Int13 Num = 81, PHYS CHS = 16383x16x63.
 ParmTable CHS, Rsvd = 9729x255x63


 PARTITION       CYLINDER          SIZE
 ----------      ------------      ----
 #   Type       Start    End      MB
 PRIMARY
 1   FAT32      0        9537     78457



 Diagnostic Results:


 Seagate DiagATA Quick Test Result:  Failed
 Recommendation:
 The "Quick Test" is adequate for most situations.
 Consider running the "Full Test" which
 verifies each sector on the drive if you need to run a more
 comprehensive diagnostic.




 Results from Seagate's DiagATA/SCSI:
 -----------------------------------------------------------------


 DIAGATA.EXE Version 3.07.40526ML
 Copyright (c) 2002 by Seagate Technology, LLC.  All rights reserved.


 -----------------------------------------------------------------
 Timer Resolution: 0.000122
 Short Test Begin: 30-Sep-2004 19:45:41
 Cable Test - 0 Errors
 Buffer Test - 0 Errors
 Identify Data
 Model Number: ST380020A
 Serial Number: 5GC0G06K
 Firmware Revision: 3.39
 Default CHS: 16383-16-63
 Current CHS: 16383-16-63
 Current Capacity: 16514064 Sectors
 Total Capacity: 156301487 Sectors
 Conductor Cable Reported
 ID Method: Unknown
 SMART Check: Passed
 DST - Errors - Status: 07
 SMART Check: Passed
 Short Test Failed: 30-Sep-2004 19:45:53



 -----------------------------------------------------------------
 End results from Seagate's DiagATA/SCSI


 ATA Full Test Result:  Failed




 Results from Seagate's DiagATA/SCSI:
 -----------------------------------------------------------------


 DIAGATA.EXE Version 3.07.40526ML
 Copyright (c) 2002 by Seagate Technology, LLC.  All rights reserved.


 -----------------------------------------------------------------
 Timer Resolution: 0.000122
 Long Test Begin: 30-Sep-2004 19:45:54
 Cable Test - 0 Errors
 Buffer Test - 0 Errors
 Identify Data
 Model Number: ST380020A
 Serial Number: 5GC0G06K
 Firmware Revision: 3.39
 Default CHS: 16383-16-63
 Current CHS: 16383-16-63
 Current Capacity: 16514064 Sectors
 Total Capacity: 156301487 Sectors
 Conductor Cable Reported
 ID Method: Unknown
 SMART Check: Passed
 AtaCore Error 2 in SeqScan
 Long Test Failed: 30-Sep-2004 19:46:05



 -----------------------------------------------------------------
 End results from Seagate's DiagATA/SCSI




 File Structure Test Result:


 Partition 1 (FAT 32 (78.4 GB) NO NAME    )    Result:  Critical Error(s)
 18 Critical Structure Error(s)
 866 Non-Critical Structure Error(s)
 0 KBytes in 0 files
 0 directories were found
 0 KBytes in 0 deleted files
 0 deleted directories were found


 ERROR SUMMARY:
 FAT I/O Error           18
 DIR I/O Error           79
 DIR Structures          284
 Orphaned Data Blocks    501
 FAT Mismatch            1
 Invalid Free Space Value 1



 NOTE:  Any report of possible errors in the file system tests are for
 informational purposes only.  We suggest you should consider testing with
 the official file system diagnostic utilities for your operating system.
 Seagate is not able to assist with troubleshooting or reviewing
 file system test results.




 ******************************************



 Recommendation:
 If you are not experiencing data loss and SeaTools reports File
 System Structure errors, they may be caused by a lock-up or
 failure to shutdown Windows correctly. Many times, these errors
 may be repaired through normal system maintenance which
 includes using the Windows provided "Defrag" and
 "Scandisk / Chkdsk / Error Checking" utilities.


 If you are experiencing a hardware error, you should isolate
 the cause and replace the failing component. If you are unsure how
 to proceed with repairs, contact a computer professional. After
 completing any maintenance tasks, run SeaTools again to
 verify that all errors have been repaired. If errors continue to
 occur, the system may not be stable. Again, contact a computer
 professional.


 If you have experienced a data loss, cease drive operation
 immediately.  Professional data recovery service is the best
 option to recover your data.


 ========================================================
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Question by:EugeneGardner
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23 Comments
 
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by:nobus
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look here : (bad sectors) if you need the data, sweat it out, otherwise, zero fill it with the utility

http://www.seagate.com/support/ts/ata/errors/03_seatools.html
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by:hkamal
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The one IDE work is to operate at the speed of the slowest connected device, so make sure your hard drive is not using the ribbon cable/controller socket as your CD/DVD drive ..
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by:EugeneGardner
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Sorry, Hkamal, I don't understand what you're saying.
Currently I have my boot disk as IDE0 master and the bad disk as IDE1 master.
IDE1 used to goto the CD drive but I pulled it so it would go to the bad Seagate drive.
Did I do bad ?
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by:nobus
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not at all, it should work
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by:gor_c
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After you swapped the CD drive to the bad hard drive, did you check in the bios that it has recognised the change?
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by:hkamal
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BasMaster or slave, primary or secondary, disks should run the same. The only thing that would slow it down from a configuration point of view is, asI mentioned, having the HDD on the same bus (cable) as something much slower (like a CD ROM drive)

I'd bootup with just one drive (and no CD drive) using each of the disks and check they're running fast enough (to isolate a driver electronics error).
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by:EugeneGardner
Comment Utility
Gor_c, yes the BIOS recognises the configuration correctly.  Booting takes about 15 minutes though as whatever questions are asked of the bad (non-boot) disk take so long to get answered.

There is only one disk on each of the two IDE channels.  The power and data cables are different from those in the original PC which housed my bad disk.  I can't boot from the bad disk.... which is why I call it a bad disk.

I've decided to take Nobus' advise and 'sweat it out' while Ghost takes a backup.  I must remember to come back next Tuesday to check the results. (last time Ghost reported 73 hours estimated time to complete).
JG
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by:nobus
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come have a game of cards while waiting....
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by:hkamal
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YIKES! Good luck.
I bought an external drive ;ast year (independent power/controller) and never regretted it. Ghost is at most a week out of date at any one time. As I am a tinkerer on the home PC, this drive saved me on a few occasions!
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by:nobus
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I had a drive once that was also slow, it gave no errors with the maxtor utility or in windows, just veeery slooow  !
i left it for a couple of weeks lying around, tried again, and the gods of electronic drives were with me : it started working normally again !! I still have no clue what and how it got fixed.
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by:gor_c
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If the drive is going to be working for that length of time, you should try to get some extra cooling to keep the hard drive cool.
The extra heat generated by the drive may cause further problems.
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by:nobus
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That sounds logic to me; so put a nice piece of copper or aluminium on it, or turn a fan on it.
Not a bad idea gor_c
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by:huntersvcs
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Had a similar problem (not quite as bad) last week.  The image I was trying to take was over 20GB and took roughly 7,5 hours.  Unfortunately, when I finally got the image done, it was corrupted and couldn't be transfered to another drive!  Disk Imaging didn't work either.  The only thing that DID work was to use "partition to partition" instead of "partition to image".  AND this only worked when the target partition was larger than the original!

Hope this helps.
Rick
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by:EugeneGardner
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The Ghost backup completed much faster than expected - 'only' about 30 hours !  The backup looks good too.  Strange thing is that after it completed I pulled the bad disk from the system and rebooted, but the machine hung just before it finished booting - twice.  I then pulled the PCI cards out and booted safe, Norton Disk Doctored the disk (no errors) and was able to boot normally again.

So what shall I do with the old disk now ?  Options which occur to me are:
1. Boot off an XP install disk to recovery console and run fdisk
2. Use Norton's Gdisk to do the same having booted from a floppy.
3. put it back in the PC, boot from good disk, enter disk management and re-partition.

Any other possibilities ?
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by:nobus
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yes, use the manufacturers tool for test and zero filling. It should report any errors, and return a brand new disk if ok.
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by:huntersvcs
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I'd try a low lever format first in an attempt to repair any bad sectors (and map out permanently bad ones) and then:

(a) rewrite the MBR in DOS (fdisk /MBR)
(b) reset partitions using fdisk or Partition Magic
(c) format FAT32 in the DOS level
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by:EugeneGardner
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Huntersvcs, why FAT32 ?  I know you can't format NTFS from DOS, but with a bootdisk(.com disk) or a WinXP install disk you can.

Would the zero fill option form Seagate's tool be better/worse than trying to get to recovery console, writing a new MBR, format with Fdisk ?

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by:huntersvcs
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Fat32 if you want to use MSDOS, NTFS if you use the WinXP CD.  I usually only format the "C" drive with NTFS (long, not quick format) and the rest Fat32 BEFORE installing the OS.  That way all your drive letters are set up during the installation and you don't have to change anything later.
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by:nobus
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if i have problems, i use all tools at my disposal, and yes, i start out with the manufacturers tool to extensively wipe the drive. As you know, FDISK or format don't do it. Afterwards i still use the fdisk and format functions, as all can help with identifying problems
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by:EugeneGardner
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I ran Seagate zeros on the bad 80GB disk and had it format it as an NTFS partition.  Added it back to the system original system (other 60GB disk having had XP installed) and the 80GB disk appeared as a 75GB disk.

I'm now running Seagate diagnostics on the 80GB disk.  Alas the "quick" test has been 10% of the way through for the last hour.

I guess when that finishes I will need to overwrite the 60GB disk with the Ghost backup, then do a repair XP installation (unless I can find the installation disks of all applications).
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nobus earned 25 total points
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Maybe it is a logic board issue; if you want to try repairing thedrive, buy an identical one, and swap the logic boards.
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by:EugeneGardner
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I did as I said and restored the Ghost backup to the good 60GB disk. That works well as the boot disk.

The bad 80GB disk is now back in the machine as an unreliable home for backups and temporary files.  It works ok for most of the time.

Many thanks to all who shared their thoughts.

JG
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