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how to undo the last command in SQL Query analyzer?

hello guys, I'm desperately need your help immediately.

i have issued a statement on my sql query analyzer that change all other record on a table. how do i undo this statement?

e.g.

instead of committing this statement

update table1 set column1 = 'a' where column2 = '1' and column3 = '2' and column1 <> 'z'

i typed the wrong statement

update table1 set column1 = 'a' where column1 <> 'z'

which changes all other record on table 1 rather than records with column1 = 'z'

here's the question. How do i undo the statement like we do to undo the last action in msword, msexcel and other app programs.

sorry about this question, all i got is 190 points. Please help me right now. I've been balancing this records to reconcile the subsidiary ledgers.


thanks.
0
elatagaw
Asked:
elatagaw
3 Solutions
 
jdlambert1Commented:
There is no Undo in SQL Server. You either have to restore from backup, or use a 3rd party tool that can undo from the Log files -- however, if your log files get reused or wiped, it will be impossible even for 3rd party tools. Unfortunately, it costs. The best tool is Log Explorer from Lumigent (www.lumigent.com). There's a trial version, but it only works with SQL Server sample databases pubs and Northwind.
0
 
AntonGCommented:
i must agree with jdlambert1.... what he says there is quite accurate.

In future, you should try to wrap Transactional statements around your queries.

That way, you could always ROLLBACK the transactions, but unfortunately, the situation you are currently in sort of renders you helpless.
0
 
Scott PletcherSenior DBACommented:
If you have a db backup and log backup, you could also forward recover the db to the point just before you issued the command.  For example, if the command was issused at 11:17a, roll forward to 11:16a (or 11:15a to be safe).

Btw, as you now know, it is safest to always first run UPDATE as SELECT and *make sure* it affects only the row(s) you expect it to effect.  So, instead of starting with:

update table1
set column1 = 'a'
where column1 <> 'z'

Start with:

SELECT *
FROM table1
WHERE column1 <> 'z'

Then, if the number of rows and values look OK, then you issue the UPDATE (or DELETE).
0
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