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Move 2003 file server to another domain

Posted on 2004-10-04
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Last Modified: 2010-04-19
Hi,

I would like to move my 2003 file server from an NT domain to a 2003 AD domain.  What are the issues that I need to consider before joining it to the new domain?  Will the files retain their current permissions or will I need to manually change permissions afterwards?

brian-
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Question by:bdebelius
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Expert Comment

by:Sembee
ID: 12218911
Are the domains linked in any way?

If not then they will retain the permissions, but they will be totally useless to you. The server will be unable to enumerate the permissions and you will just see a list of numbers. This will mean resetting all the permissions afterwards.

Simon.
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Author Comment

by:bdebelius
ID: 12219011
There is a trust between the domains.
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Expert Comment

by:Sembee
ID: 12219067
The permissions will stick - although if the long term aim is to get rid of the original domain then you will need to redo the permissions eventually as Windows will not treat the domains as equal even if the same username is available in both:

domain1\username
domain2\username

Those are two different accounts.

Simon.

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Author Comment

by:bdebelius
ID: 12219119
Good.

How would renaming the server after the joining the new domain e(a)ffect things?
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Sembee earned 500 total points
ID: 12220102
Shouldn't upset the server too much as long as it isn't a DC.
However you wouldn't rename it once it has joined the new domain - do it beforehand.
Thus...

1. Reset local admin password (to ensure that you know it).
2. Drop in to workgroup.
3. Reboot.
4. Login as local admin.
5. Rename.
6. Reboot.
7. Login as local admin again.
8. Join to new domain.
9. Reboot.
10. Login as domain admin.

etc.

The trust is two way?

Simon.
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Author Comment

by:bdebelius
ID: 12220196
It is a two way trust.
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Expert Comment

by:Sembee
ID: 12220220
You should be ok.
I would test first if possible though. Use a desktop or a VMWARE machine, set some permissions and move it across and see what happens.

Simon.
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