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Need 300GB hard drive in Windows XP Professional. Is this possible?

Hello,

I have an application running on a Windows XP Professional (SP1) machine which creates media files from audio streamed into it.  I need to be able to store 60 days worth of this data (which is approximately 220 GB).  I currently have a 120 GB drive installed for the media, but would like to replace that with a 300 GB IDE drive.  Is this possible with Windows XP Prof, what things should I look out for?  I have just never worked with a drive this large, and want to be sure before I buy it.  Thanks.
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electricd7
Asked:
electricd7
1 Solution
 
katacombzCommented:
the main answer is yes windows XP will support the drive,

Maximum Sizes on NTFS Volumes
In theory, the maximum NTFS volume size is 264 clusters minus 1 cluster. However, the maximum NTFS volume size as implemented in Windows XP Professional is 232 clusters minus 1 cluster. For example, using 64-KB clusters, the maximum NTFS volume size is 256 terabytes minus 64 KB. Using the default cluster size of 4 KB, the maximum NTFS volume size is 16 terabytes minus 4 KB.


found on:

http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/Windows/XP/all/reskit/en-us/Default.asp?url=/resources/documentation/Windows/XP/all/reskit/en-us/prkc_fil_tdrn.asp

things to consider

will the controller on your motherboad support large drives?

redundance, if you are storing this much critical data on a single drive what are your recovery options in the event of a disk failure?

running in a raid 0 with redundant disks?

backing data up to tape\cd\dvd?

My main concern with large data stores is failover and recovery, large data stores should always at a minimum be placed in a mirrored set so if (when) 1 drive fails the second will prevent data loss.

raid 5 more expensive but will provide faster access and redundancy

then haivng a tapestorage solutioin to backup the entire thing incase of severe hardware failure.

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CallandorCommented:
WinXP SP1 can handle drives that large.  Since your current hardware is a 120GB drive, the BIOS can probably handle it too, but you may need to check with the motherboard manufacturer.  I think there will be no problem.
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electricd7Author Commented:
Ok great.  I found that my IDE controller is an INTEL 82801BA.  Does anyone know what the max disk size is for that controller?
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CallandorCommented:
It's not your controller that matters, it's the BIOS.  What motherboard and BIOS do you have?
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jacaucCommented:
No need to worry about that... really!
All will be supported just fine!
...if you can get your hands on a 300Gb drive that is...

You can also consider creating a "volume" from a couple of say 120Gb drives to make up one logical drive with 480Gb if you use 3 120Gb drive - as an example

Hope this helps!
;)
J
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cagriCommented:
Dear electricd7,

If you ever consider replacing your board in near future I recommend a board with on-board RAID controller (which are really cheap in these days). This enables you to  create a RAID 0 disk set (stripe) using 2 or 3 120Gb disks which virtually gives you twice to thrice speed at once.
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electricd7Author Commented:
Thanks all for your help.  I have a 300 GB Maxtor arriving here tomorrow by 10:30AM!
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