Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people, just like you, are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
Solved

DFS/FRS-Replication/Failover/Backup-How to for Win2000 to Win2003

Posted on 2004-10-04
3
362 Views
Last Modified: 2008-02-01
I have been reading post after post and need help with laying out steps logically. Then I can go back to posts and fill in blanks.

Current System:
WIN2000 server RAID 1 (4 SCSI drives) 1 domain with AD. Exchange (used) and SQL (not used) also on server.

Wanting:
Install WIN2003 server RAID 5 with 1TB storage and use for failover/replication of WIN2000 server and for
additional long-term storage of data (setup as separate partition?).

Most Important- the new WIN2003 server must be failover in event of hardware failure on WIN2000.

I've seen threads talking about VSS and others talking about DFS/FRS. I think DFS/FRS is the way but can someone step it out for me. Thanks!!!!
0
Comment
Question by:FUROG
  • 2
3 Comments
 
LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:rhandels
ID: 12224241
Hi,

First off all, if you are going to add the 2003 machine within the 2000 domain as a DC (you need it to be back-up right??) you should need to run adprep /forestprep and then adprep /domainprep.

VSS is the Shadow Copy Restore Process. This is very usefull for users, because they can restore their own file if they happen todelete one. But, it's not a failover if the 2000 server fails. DFS indeed is.

DFS is actually a service that is used to have multiple shares within more servers put together to one DFS share, that's it's main purpose. You can, indeed, have a copy back-up of DFS. It's set up quite easily, first off all just make sure to create the DFS root, and then, in the properties of DFS, make sure to add a (not quite sure how it's called) Cached option for the DFS root..
0
 

Author Comment

by:FUROG
ID: 12230722
Totally appreciate the response :-)

Can you step me thru the creating a forest and domain prep. By line...pls.

Does DFS/FRS mirror the server exact? How from RAID1 to RAID5 and different OS/storage space?
If you can point me to links/sites with real, real good explanations?

:-)
0
 
LVL 23

Accepted Solution

by:
rhandels earned 500 total points
ID: 12234928
Hi,

Put in the 2003 cd into the 2000 DC and go to command prompt (the I386 folder on the cd) and type in

adprep /forestprep

And then, for every domain you have (or where you would like to add the 2003 server)
adprepr /domainprep

This way the 2000 domain is ready for a 2003 DC.

Here are some links on how to set up DFS. I don't think DFS bothers much which RAID setting u use..

http://www.tek-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=912902
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;311398&sd=tech

0

Featured Post

Netscaler Common Configuration How To guides

If you use NetScaler you will want to see these guides. The NetScaler How To Guides show administrators how to get NetScaler up and configured by providing instructions for common scenarios and some not so common ones.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Numerous times I have been asked this questions that what is it that makes my machine log on so slow, there have been cases where computers took 23 minute exactly after taking password and getting to the desktop. Interesting thing was the fact th…
I've always wanted to allow a user to have a printer no matter where they login. The steps below will show you how to achieve just that. In this Article I'll show how to deploy printers automatically with group policy and then using security fil…
With Secure Portal Encryption, the recipient is sent a link to their email address directing them to the email laundry delivery page. From there, the recipient will be required to enter a user name and password to enter the page. Once the recipient …
In an interesting question (https://www.experts-exchange.com/questions/29008360/) here at Experts Exchange, a member asked how to split a single image into multiple images. The primary usage for this is to place many photographs on a flatbed scanner…

839 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question