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Posted on 2004-10-04
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Last Modified: 2013-12-27
Solaris 5.7.  I've changed the name of a script in /etc/rc3.d.  I changed the upper case S to a lower case s. Now when I restart the server.  I see a line that says bad trap in module xx it's pointing to a null value.  Then it does a core dump successfully, and then it reboots.  It does this repeatedly.  I've used the Stop Key + A to get to an OK prompt.  How can I get past the OK prompt so I can rename the script file?  Or, how can I boot up so that I can get to the script file to rename it?
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Question by:mobot
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3 Comments
 
LVL 38

Assisted Solution

by:yuzh
yuzh earned 400 total points
ID: 12223746
You have to use Solaris Software CD to boot up the system in single user mode (or boot
from a boot server to single user mode).

assume that you have a cdrom in your Sun box, put the Software CD in:
1) <Stop> A  
2) When you see ok prompt, put the Solaris CD in, then type in:
boot cdrom -s
to boot up to single user mode

3) mount your root file system, eg:
mount /dev/dsk/c0t0d0s0 /a

cd /mnt/etc/rc3.d

use "mv" command you cahnge the file names backup to what it was.

PS: Solaris startup script name start with a Upper case S, if you change it to something
      else, it will not run.

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LVL 34

Accepted Solution

by:
PsiCop earned 600 total points
ID: 12226663
If you changed something in /etc/rc3.d, then it doesn't affect the operation of your machine until you reach Run Level 3. So there is no need to boot to the CD-ROM, you should be able to just do a normal single-user boot on the machine, reverse your change, and then bring it up normally.

At the OpenBoot PROM prompt, I would enter --> boot -s

It will come up to single-user mode, and you login as root at the special prompt it presents. cd in the /etc/rc3.d and mv the file back to having an upper-case S. Then exit the shell and the system should boot up normally.

What entry in /etc/rc3.d did you change?
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Author Comment

by:mobot
ID: 12229573
Thanks to both of you for your help. I split the points because I learned how to boot from the cd, etc from yuzh's answer.  PsiCop's solution worked just as it was outlined.
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