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HP/Compaq D220mt CPU fan direction

Posted on 2004-10-04
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Last Modified: 2013-11-10
Hi all,
       I'm working on an HP/Compaq D220mt Desktop P4 2.66mhz cooled by a Cooler Master Fan and large heatsink.
 This PC has an intake/exhaust funnel from CPU to rear vent in case.
 My question........is the CPU fan on this model supposed to suck the hot air from the CPU and exhaust it out the back?
Or is it suppose to suck the air in from the back vent and blow it upon the CPU? Will it matter either way?
 Someone has previously tinkered with the CPU fan and I want to make sure it is setup correctly.
 Many thanks and regards,
                                      bill
 
 
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Question by:ntfsbill
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10 Comments
 
LVL 92

Expert Comment

by:nobus
ID: 12224471
most fans i know take the air from the cpu to the exhaust
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Accepted Solution

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crazijoe earned 65 total points
ID: 12225718
Dell's use the same configuration. Pull air from the CPU and exhaust it out the back. This is not an uncommon setup. I do remember The large Alpha heatsinks on older Slot1 P2 and P3 exhausting air out of the heatsink instead of blowing into the heatsink.
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Author Comment

by:ntfsbill
ID: 12226661
So,
     does it really matter...performance wise for this particlular model? Most PCs' I've seen use the CPU fan for blowing air upon the CPU.
 The owner would like to put a separate exhaust fan on the back of the case. If I do this, than the CPU fan would probably have to be positioned to blow air at the CPU. I'm wonderding if it is safe to change the design of the airflow in this PC?
Anymore comments would be great!!

Thanks and regards,
                             bill
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Expert Comment

by:crazijoe
ID: 12226713
It really doesn't matter as long as the CPU itself gets sufficient cooling. You could change the CPU heatsink to a standard one with a fan on it.
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LVL 92

Assisted Solution

by:nobus
nobus earned 60 total points
ID: 12226778
Most important is that you get an airstream through the case, say like this :
underside front = intake, flow throughcase passing components, exhaust by power supply.
If you wish, you can hook an extra Fan up, and put it on the intake, or at the exhaust to have enough cooling.
If you do this, buying a silent fan is not a bad idea if the system is used in a silent environment.
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LVL 69

Expert Comment

by:Callandor
ID: 12227002
I think it is better to blow hot air out, for the reason that doing it the other way will result in hot air sitting around the inside of the case, raising ambient temperatures.  Your hard drives, video card, and other components will suffer from this exposure, and you always want to move hot air away as soon as possible.
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Author Comment

by:ntfsbill
ID: 12228647
I guess I'm from the "old school". Drawing hot air away from the CPU doesn't seem as efficient as blowing air upon the CPU. BTW, the CPU in question has a large heatsink and the CPU fan is mounted to the heatsink, except it vents the hot air out the back rather than blow air at CPU.
Could this be a topic that has no final right or wrong answer, only preferences?

Thanks everybody,
                          bill
0
 
LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:crazijoe
ID: 12228931
It uses the same concept of a car radiator and engine fan. The fan sucks the air through the radiator.
Pretty much it is how you want to set it up. Yes personal preference.
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LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:PAR1033
ID: 12229011
With your setup, with the funnel from the CPU to the rear of the case, my guessis that it would be pulling the air from the CPU out the back of the case, not the other way around.  The CPU generates a lot of heat in these new machines.
A case without baffles blows air from the top of the CPU/heatsink down over the CPU and then the hot air stays in the case.  A better way would be to have the baffles and pull air in from the front or sides of the computer case, over the motherboard, accross the CPU and up and out the back of the case.  
Some Dells and HP's and servers have both a CPU fan and another at the top rear of the baffle to blow it out the back of the case.
0
 

Author Comment

by:ntfsbill
ID: 12233850
Thanks for your help everyone!!
I've discovered here, that this type of CPU cooling (drawing hot air away from CPU), as was in my case, is common place these days.
 I have, however, decided to change the cooling airflow configuration somewhat, based on the suggestions here!!

Warmest regards,
                         bill
0

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