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unable to get a ip assigned to networked computer

Posted on 2004-10-04
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I have just upgraded one of my pc to win 2000 prof  I am unable to connect to the internet.  I am getting a connected status but unable to browse.  when i go the the command prompt and do an ipconfig i am getting either all 00000 or a ip of 169.254.8.253  subnet of 255.255.0.0
when i try to release  this i get the message "all adapters bound to dhcp do not have dhcp addresses.  The addresses were automatically configured and cannot be released."

I have checked all the setting and they match the setting on this pc also running the same os.  i have no proplems connecting on this pc.

I am also getting an error message when i start up:
"sqlmangr.exe The ordinal 29 could not be located in the dynamic link library odbcbcp.dll"

when talking to my dsl tech service he thought there was a connection between this error and my connection problem.  i read the solution to the ordinal 29 missing error on this sight and am completly lost i have no idea how to begin to try the solution to that problem.  but it seemed to me that it would be much easier to deal with this if i could access the web on that pc.

thanks for you prompt response

kab
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Question by:Chadddaniel
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by:jacauc
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OK ...those 169.x.x.x address are "autoconfigured" Windows IP addresses.
I've never been sure exactly WHY though...
But this means that you are simply just NOT getting an IP from the DHCP server. (check/replace the cable/modem/switch/ whatever you are connecting to)

I doubt if it is in any way connected to that other error.
see this topic for more info on that: http://www.experts-exchange.com/Databases/Q_21074319.html


Hope this answers your Question.
Cheers
J
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by:anupnellip
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could you please explain your network setup . I mean how exactaly r u connecting to the internet ?? do you have a dhl modem or a router ?? r there other computer in your network or is it a stand alone PC & you r conecting directly to the internet using dsl model ?  . from your Ipconfig setup it simply means that the m/c is not getting an IP address from the dhcp server & is being assigned a default address .
 I don't think your problem is assocated with the error message you r getting .


 
 
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by:cooledit
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hi, Chadddaniel

Are you sure the RJ45 cable is ok ?.

DHCP works like this
Machine get the IP address with a lease time. Ex:
IP Address, etc, etc.
Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : 04 October 2004 07:58:40
Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : 09 October 2004 07:58:40

When half the lease have run out the Pc tries to contact the DHCP server to say "hay there I need a IP Address" then the server could reply the one you have x.x.x.x is ok and renew the lease time.

DHCP uses udp 68 & 69 to obtain / communicate witht the DHCP server.

Who is the DHCP server at your site ?..
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by:tapkep
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Has network card changed? If yes, DHCP server might be bound to your previuos MAC. You can either ask network administrator to update your MAC in DHCP config, or you can change your current MAC to the previuosly used. See if that helps.

Now you don't get IP from DHCP server.
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by:crazijoe
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Definitly need to know your network configuration.
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by:Chadddaniel
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my network config is:

i have a dsl modem that uplinks my connection to a "10/100 fast ethernet switch" hub with a enet cable.  then i have a enet cable going to each computer from the hub.  i have two computers that are also running win 2000 prof connected and i do not have any problems with them.  i have tried to make sure that i have all the setting the same as the two that work.  just cannot figure out what i might be missing.
i have tried two different cables.
when i go to check the status it indicates that i am connected. so i don't think it is my cable.

what does "MAC" stand for?  what is its function?

hope this helps you help me


kab
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by:PennGwyn
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> what does "MAC" stand for?  what is its function?

Media Access Control.  Every NIC has a 48-bit identifier which is used as its "layer 2" address and must be unique on the subnet.  The provider may have "learned" your old MAC address and so not be recognizing your new NIC.  There is *probably* a way to tell your new NIC to use the old NIC's address instead of the one in its ROM.

(If you didn't replace the NIC, this whole subthread is irrelevant to your problem.)

Any chance you have a firewall blocking the DHCP traffic?
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by:Chadddaniel
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i have not replaced my network card and my connection does not have to go through my other computers to connect so i do not see how my firewall could be an issue.  i do not have firewall on that computer.
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by:crazijoe
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Since you are not using a router your ISP would be the DHCP server. I would probably check with you ISP because it seems as if there server is not giving you another IP address.
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by:Chadddaniel
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i checked with my isp and they allow up to 7 ip addresses.  
they also had me check my ip stack i pinged 127.0.0.1  and that worked fine.  they told me that maybe my drivers are not updated for my network card so i checked that and it has the correct driver.

remember my status on my lan shows that i have been connected for 11+ hrs 840 packets sent 0 recieved

any other ideas  are we narrowing things down yet?

kab
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by:crazijoe
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Another good idea would be to get recient drivers from the manufacturer and install them. The device manager might show a good driver but it could be corrupt. I would reinstall the NIC drivers.
Also check the lights on your hub. Do they seem to be flashing in a pattern? If so then your NIC is constantly broadcasting. Try and get a static ip from your ISP and assign it to the problem PC.
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by:johnpitt
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Dhcp is not routable by default so I would not rely on your ISP to pass DHCP to your local machines. You really need something local on your LAN to handle DHCP. An inexpensive DSL router will do the trick.
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by:Fred Marshall
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Yes, check the ethernet cable!  Most likely wat to check it is to replace it.
Next candidate, the NIC.

Having 0.0.0.0 or 169.xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx means that the computer isn't connected to anything.  Firewall software can make this happen as well as a bad cable or connector.

If you had not said that you are getting the IP addresses from your ISP I would have suggested setting a static IP address on the offending computer.

This makes me wonder how you're getting multiple IP addresses from the ISP.  Through what kind of connection is this happening?  Are there separate modems or......????  Otherwise, I rather doubt the notion that you can have multiple IP addresses from the ISP with a single modem.  You did say "DSL", right?

There are two kinds of DSL modems:
- Type 1) those that simply connect and provide a single IP address to the computer that's connected to them
- Type 2) those that include a router, provide Network Address Translation (NAT) and provide one or more ethernet ports on the "inside" / LAN.  In this case, the inside of the modem/routerr has an internal LAN IP address and the internet IP address is transparent to you.
- In Type 2, you can sometimes shut off NAT so that the internet IP address  passes through.

In Type 1 you can follow the modem with a router that will provide NAT.  This then looks pretty much the same as Type 2 with NAT enabled.  The internal IP address of the router is most typically 192.168.1.1 / sometimes 192.168.0.1 and rarely 10.0.0.1.  The computers will have different addresses in the same range.

My guess is that you have a Type 1 modem that worked with a single computer and does not work in whatever the hardware configuration is.  My guess is that the "upgraded" computer wasn't connected to the internet before in this "network".

My guess is that you need a router to provide NAT and thereby an internal LAN available range of IP addresses.
You can turn on DHCP on such a router or you can assign static IP addresses to the computers or you can do both.

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by:anupnellip
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let me guess . You say that you have 2 computers in your network that works fine . Are they using the same  dhl connections as yours . If yes then please post the IPCONFIG /all output of  these computers .
 It may give us more idea about your setup & where you r going wrong .
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by:crazijoe
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I do know that you can have multiple IP from a single broadband modem because you can purchase more that a single IP from you ISP. They cost extra. Cox charges 6.95 for each additional IP and Quest charges the same. I have done this about 3 years ago before getting a router. The problem here seems to be that he is not getting the IP or the NIC is not accepting the IP from the ISP. It must have worked before because he states this happened after he upgraded to Win2K. I would have to say the reinstall the NIC drivers. His best option is to just get a $25.00 router and drop the extra IPs he is paying for.
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by:Fred Marshall
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After reading what's going on, I wonder if the ISP has set a limit of 2 IP addresses set somewhere - even though they *say* you are allowed 7 (maybe from their accounting system)?

I realize that this is counter to having had 3 computers working before - but strange things and coincidences do happen.  And, ISP settings get corrupted from time to time.

What happens if you ad a 4th computer?  Does it get an IP address?  That may be an easy test to eliminate this perhaps remote possibility.

Unless you have to access the computers from the outside world / internet, I really like the idea of going to a single IP address and using a simple router.  Since you're using DHCP I guess outside connections with stable IP addresses aren't important to you.

I don't have experience with multiple IP addresses through a single modem but let's see if I can't help anyway....
When you say that the computer shows that it's "connected" are you sure that this isn't simply an ethernet connection?
With single IP addresses via a modem there is sometimes a connection step that's necessary for PPPOE or some such protocol.  Either this is done by a router or it's done by THE computer.  This connection is shown in the list of connections when you run IPCONFIG using the Command Prompt - in addition to the ethernet connection that takes the IP address.
In other situations the connection is just always there and I believe this "extra" connection is unecessary.
I presume that if you have the first situation then one of your computers is establishing the connection by "dialing" up PPPOE.  
Either way, once you have the connection then I'd assume that then it just looks like a wire and multiple IP addresses are no different than with any wired connection.
So, can we confirm the situation?

There are only a few things to check:
1) You are connected to the ISP with this computer (and, thus, to the other computers)
2) The ISP is able to assign an IP address to this computer
3) The computer is able to accept the IP address assignment.

To check #1 you might confirm that you are able to connect at all.
To test this I would assign a static IP address to the computer that's in the range that the ISP would give you and not the same as any currently assigned.
After this is done I would ping the other computers and out onto the internet.
This should prove that the hardware and networking are all working.

To check #2 you might add a 4th computer. If it works, you know the ISP is able to assign another IP address.

To check #3, go back to "Obtain an IP Address Automatically" on this computer.

If #1 and #2 work and if #3 fails then you focus on this computer.
I would run the lspfix from: http://www.cexx.org/lspfix.htm
You might remove and reinstall the TCP/IP protocol for the ethernet interface on this computer - reboot after the uninstall and after the install.
You might also check out:
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/2000/server/reskit/en-us/tcpip/part1/tcpch03.mspx

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by:Chadddaniel
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hi,  
finally i am currently senting this from the "problem" computer.  i had checked my cable to begin with changed the ends and since the lights were all good decided it was good.  to make a long story short here is what i did maybe someone can explain why this worked.

this cable i am using is long (45ft) when i configured the wires in the same color order as my other computers which is
brown- brown/white - green - green/white - blue - blue/white - orange - orange/white

this works with my shorter cable but if i took this same order on the long cable even my other pc would not connect.

when i purchase new ends the package had a diagram with this  order:

brown - brown/white - orange - blue/white - blue - orange-white - green - green/white

with this order the long cable works  why is this?

I got the first order from a previous networking friend who had helped me set up my network before we moved.

kab
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by:tapkep
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Standard Ethernet cable is
http://www.netspec.com/helpdesk/wiredoc.html

orange/white,   orange,   green/white,   blue,    blue/white,   green,   brown/white,   brown



For cross-over cable, one end is like previuos, another is :

White/Green,   Green,   White/Orange,   Blue,  White/Blue,  Orange,  White/Brown,  Brown

There are 2 unused pairs in 10baseTX and 100baseTX, but generally speaking your friend's wiring scheme is invalid.
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by:crazijoe
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I would check both ends of the cable that is faulty. I'd make a bet that they are not configured the same.
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Fred Marshall earned 400 total points
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This is *wrong* wiring:
brown- brown/white - green - green/white - blue - blue/white - orange - orange/white

I always say that a cable wired this way may work for 15-20 feet and probably not work at 50 feet.
Why? because the twisted pairs in the cable aren't being used together.  They are connected at adjacent pins - which is not how the signals are arranged on the pins.  I would not be surprised that any improperly but consistently wired cable would *work* or *not work* or *work intermittently* depending on signals and the electromagnetic surroundings that the cable is in.

The wires are twisted together in pairs in order to balance each signal (Transmit and Receive) to reduce crosstalk and noise.  Some pins on the connector are adjacent and some are not.

As long as a cable is consistent end-to-end, it will provide copper connectivity and the cable can be mixed with others built different ways.  That EIA/TIA 568A and 568B cables can't be mixed is a myth.  Both cables properly provide twisted pairs for the signals and the electrons don't care what color the insulation is!

This is correct wiring and meets the EIA/TIA 568B standard:

brown - brown/white - green - blue/white - blue - green/white - orange - orange/white

(this as seen from the side of the connector with the clip).  It's easier to envision in the opposite order looking through the connector on the side opposite the clip:

orange/white - orange - green/white - blue - blue/white - green - brown/white - brown

See: http://duxcw.com/digest/Howto/network/cable/cable5.htm
for great description and pictures of EIA/TIA 568 A and B, etc.
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by:jacauc
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well.. there you go..
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by:Chadddaniel
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thank you all for your help on this.  i really appriciated the longer detailed comment it really helps me to understand this stuff better.  
thanks again

kab
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