1720 Load Balancing

I have a 1720 Cisco Router with two point to point T1s pointing back to our remote office.  Currently I have one T1 for upload and 1 T1 for download.  However, i would like to configure it so that:

1: there is automatic failover
2: there is some load balancing since most of the traffic is downloading

How can i accomplish this?  Ive been told that all i have to do is install IGRP but i dont think that will do the job.
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JFrederick29Connect With a Mentor Commented:
A routing protocol will in fact do the trick but I assume you are not currently running a routing protocol on your network or else automatic load balancing/failover would already be taking place.  If you don't want to run a routing protocol, you can use two equal cost static routes or if using PPP encapsulation on your P2P circuits, you can use PPP Multilink.

At "Central" site, two static routes to the Remote Office Ethernet LAN:

ip route
ip route

At Remote Office, two static routes to the "Central" site Ethernet LAN:

ip route
ip route

Both routes will be installed in the routing table on each router and load balancing will occur, if one of the interfaces go down, the "down" route will be removed from the routing table and all traffic wiill be sent over the other circuit.
You can aluse enable CEF to help, once you get the routes equal.
eigrp will do load balancing reasonably easily, as jfrederick29 suggested.  static routes are somewhat archaic in nature now, i'd suggest moving to eigrp if you run all cisco gear.   igrp will suffice if you have to interface to non-cisco equipment (eigrp is proprietary).
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IGRP is also Cisco proprietary.
oh yea thats right..heh, there isnt much left that hasnt been touched by cisco in some way O_o
PennGwynConnect With a Mentor Commented:
OSPF isn't proprietary (the "O" stands for "Open").

There's nothing archaic about static routes; for simple networks like this with routers of limited horsepower, they're the tool of choice.

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