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date changes itself

Posted on 2004-10-05
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
I am using redhat linux.  my timezone is GMT+3. I set the GMT date using the " date -u XXXXXXXXX"  command. when I execute the " date " command afterwards I see my correct local time and "date -u " gave me the correct GMT time. At that point my hwclock showed my correct localtime. after 20 minutes although my hwclock not changed, my date changed itself 3 hours ahead. Now  both my local time and GMT time  are showing 3 hours ahead. 20 minutes after seting the correct hours,  my clock jumps again three hours ahead.  my ntpd is not active. how can I make my computer stay at the time that I adjusted.
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Question by:tolgaonel
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blkline earned 125 total points
ID: 12225819
Is your hardware clock really set for GMT?     Reboot your computer and verify that the hardware clock is set to GMT.  Then, boot into Linux and log on as root.   Delete the file   /etc/adjtime   and run redhat-config-date.      Verify your timezone and that the box "System clock uses UTC" is checked.   Now set your clock thus:     rdate -s clock.psu.edu;hwclock --systohc

You should find everything working properly at this point.
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