• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 2755
  • Last Modified:

java.sql.Date

I have a date whcih I retrieve from a database.

java.sql.Date date =  resultset.getDate("DATE_FIELD")

this field is stored as a data type Date in oracle, an example  12/03/2004 12:35

I wish to obtain this string value, I use the simpleDateFormat class as
sdf = SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy HH:mm:ss");

I use the format method which gives me 12/03/2004, I also need the time part.

How can I do this?
0
inzaghi
Asked:
inzaghi
3 Solutions
 
JK2429Commented:
http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/Date.html

Look at getTime().

This returns what you are lookign for.
0
 
sudhakar_koundinyaCommented:
This example will help u

`import java.text.DateFormat;
import java.util.Date;

public class DateFormatExample1 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // Make a new Date object. It will be initialized to the current time.
        Date now = new Date();

        // See what toString() returns
        System.out.println(" 1. " + now.toString());

        // Next, try the default DateFormat
        System.out.println(" 2. " + DateFormat.getInstance().format(now));

        // And the default time and date-time DateFormats
        System.out.println(" 3. " + DateFormat.getTimeInstance().format(now));
        System.out.println(" 4. " +
            DateFormat.getDateTimeInstance().format(now));

        // Next, try the short, medium and long variants of the
        // default time format
        System.out.println(" 5. " +
            DateFormat.getTimeInstance(DateFormat.SHORT).format(now));
        System.out.println(" 6. " +
            DateFormat.getTimeInstance(DateFormat.MEDIUM).format(now));
        System.out.println(" 7. " +
            DateFormat.getTimeInstance(DateFormat.LONG).format(now));

        // For the default date-time format, the length of both the
        // date and time elements can be specified. Here are some examples:
        System.out.println(" 8. " + DateFormat.getDateTimeInstance(
            DateFormat.SHORT, DateFormat.SHORT).format(now));
        System.out.println(" 9. " + DateFormat.getDateTimeInstance(
            DateFormat.MEDIUM, DateFormat.SHORT).format(now));
        System.out.println("10. " + DateFormat.getDateTimeInstance(
            DateFormat.LONG, DateFormat.LONG).format(now));
    }
}

0
 
sudhakar_koundinyaCommented:
following are results for above formats

 1. Tue Oct 05 22:20:00 GMT+05:30 2004
 2. 10/5/04 10:20 PM
 3. 10:20:00 PM
 4. Oct 5, 2004 10:20:00 PM
 5. 10:20 PM
 6. 10:20:00 PM
 7. 10:20:00 PM GMT+05:30
 8. 10/5/04 10:20 PM
 9. Oct 5, 2004 10:20 PM
10. October 5, 2004 10:20:00 PM GMT+05:30
0
What does it mean to be "Always On"?

Is your cloud always on? With an Always On cloud you won't have to worry about downtime for maintenance or software application code updates, ensuring that your bottom line isn't affected.

 
sudhakar_koundinyaCommented:
Option 3,5,6,7 will help u in your case
0
 
sudhakar_koundinyaCommented:
u can pass SQL date instead of java.util.Date to above example

Regards
Sudhakar
0
 
sudhakar_koundinyaCommented:
0
 
CEHJCommented:
Use

java.util.Date date =  new java.util.Date(resultset.getTimestamp("DATE_FIELD").getTime());

then your SimpleDateFormat should work OK
0
 
objectsCommented:
Date d = resultset.getTimestamp("DATE_FIELD");
SimpleDateFormat sdf = SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy HH:mm:ss");
System.out.println(sdf.format(d));

0
 
CEHJCommented:
:-) objects' answer if more direct (i was forgetting that Timestamp extends Date)
0
 
sudhakar_koundinyaCommented:
Thanks,
:-)
0

Featured Post

Hire Technology Freelancers with Gigs

Work with freelancers specializing in everything from database administration to programming, who have proven themselves as experts in their field. Hire the best, collaborate easily, pay securely, and get projects done right.

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now