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Routing Wireless Subnet to Lan Using Linksys WRT54G

Posted on 2004-10-05
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Ok I need to setup wireless at our office.  We are on a Class C network (192.168.x.x).  Our DHCP Server is assigning 192.168.1.x IP addresses to our LAN equipment.  We just purchased a Linksys WRT54G Wireless Router.  

I want to have it assign DHCP to all clients connected wirelessly 192.168.2.x and then want the 192.168.1.x and 192.168.2.x networks to be available to each other.  I especially need the 192.168.2.x clients to be able to connect to our 192.168.1.x domain and see the computers, file server, and production server on that subnet.  

Linksys's website is down right now for some reason so I am asking the question here.  Thanks for your help!!!
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Question by:r270ba
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by:holger12345
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lets resume: As you said you purchased the wireless router new, I state that your LAN has internet access without this router and you only want to use it as a wireless access point, right?

The only routing option for standard equipment is to route between the WAN side and the LAN side (even if there are 4 ports at the LAN side - that is only one... it's a buildin switch).

So if you want to route anything with your Linksys you'll have to put the WAN side to your existing LAN and use the IP protocol at this side - if you only have the option to setup PPPoE or ADSL or else... then it's sorry.

The inside IP of your Lnksys should be the default gateway of the wireless equipment and you have setup a route from "WAN" to LAN
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by:JonSh
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This question is fairly simple, but you've left out an important piece of information.  Is there a router on the 192.168.1.0 network?  So far, all I know is that there is a DHCP server.  A router makes the job simple, otherwise we are going to have the DHCP server tell everyone about the gateway address to the 192.168.2.0 network.

Lets assume a router at 192.168.1.1  Then this becomes a trivial exercise.  First set up the WRT54G to have a LAN address of 192.168.2.1 and a WAN address of something hardcoded on the 192.168.1.0 network, say 192.168.1.254 as an example.  Then add a route to the router at 192.168.1.1 for the network 192.168.2.0 with a gateway address of 192.168.1.254.  This allows 192.168.1.0 users find 192.168.2.0 resources.  192.168.2.0 users will automatically find 192.168.1.0 resources since they are default route from the WRT54G.

hope this helps
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by:r270ba
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There is a router but I do not have control over it.  I can contact our ISP and have them make changes to it though.  Would that be the easiest solution?

What if I did not have access to the 192.168.1.1 router...then would it be difficult to setup routing on my DHCP server?  

An Update:  I have looked up "subnet" on linksys's support page and it says it can be done but is not supported through linksys tech support.  Is this an unreasonable request (I really didn't think it was).  If so then how do I go about segmenting up the wireless from the LAN?  I tried assigning a segment of IPs using the routers DHCP on the same 192.168.1.x network but for some reason the computer with an assigned IP address from the wireless router couldn't see any computers assigned by the DHCP server.  

I would prefer to do one of the first 2 options above using subnets but if that is unreasonable I can settle for help with the segmenting of 192.168.1.x addresses.

Hope this helps.  Please ask for more info.

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by:JonSh
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Well....

1st of all, if I didn't have access to my edge router (the one closest to the outside world, in this case the ISP controls it) I'd put one in-between their router and my LAN immediately so I could have better edge control.  The network between their router would be 192.168.1.0 and I'd convert my inside LAN to be 172.16.n.n (easy since you have a DHCP server).  Then you have a ton of options as to how to connect this wifi network you are building.

If you have available address space on your LAN and not too much TCP congestion, then add  the WRT54G as an access point without using the routing, and you need to make no changes.  Your wifi devices will also get DHCP from the 192.168.1.n DHCP server.

None of your requests sound unreasonable to me.  If you really need network segmentation, then we'll diagram that depending on your architecture :)
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by:lrmoore
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All you have to do is setup the Linksys connecting the WAN port to the local 192.168.1.x subnet, set the LAN IP to 192.168.2.1
and let 'er rip..
The only problem will be connectivity between the LAN and Wireless, initiating on the LAN.
> I especially need the 192.168.2.x clients to be able to connect to our 192.168.1.x domain and see the computers, file server, and production server on that subnet.  
If you set the Linksys to "router" mode vs "gateway" mode, you will disable NAT, so that you can have the full 2-way communications. The issue is that none of your domain systems know how to get to the 192.168.2.x subnet, only to the default gateway.
If you can convince the owners of that router, they can simply add a static route pointing to your Linksys for the 192.168.2.x subnet.
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by:r270ba
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jonSh -  www.tsppumps.com/network.pdf is a copy of our network architecture....take a look and see what you think...

lrmoore - I just looked at this wireless router again and I can set its IP to 192.168.2.x however I just noticed that it will only assign 192.168.1.x IP range.  So I guess what I am trying to do is out....

All - How will I just set it up to act as an access point?
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by:lrmoore
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>- I just looked at this wireless router again and I can set its IP to 192.168.2.x however I just noticed that it will only assign 192.168.1.x IP range.  So I guess what I am trying to do is out....

Did you set the WAN IP, or the LAN IP?
If you set the LAN IP to 192.168.2.1, the router will reboot, then come back with the DHCP settings:

Local IP Address: [192].[168].[  2].[  1]
Subnet Mask:      [255].[255].[255].[  0]
Local DHCP server (*)Enabled  ( ) Disabled
Start IP Address:   192 . 168 . 2 . [   ]   <== what did you put in this box?
Number of Address:  [    ]   <== what did you put in this box?
IP address Range:   192.168.2.x ~ xx
DNS IP Address  [   ].[   ].[   ].[   ]  <== what did you put here?

If you just want the Linksys to operate as an Access Point only, the Disable the Local DHCP server and plug a LAN port into the local area network, assign the LAN ip 192.168.1.x  

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by:r270ba
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Local IP Address: [192].[168].[  2].[  1]
Subnet Mask:      [255].[255].[255].[  0]
Local DHCP server (*)Enabled  ( ) Disabled
Start IP Address:   192 . 168 . 2 . [  *100* ]   <== what did you put in this box?
Number of Address:  [  *100*  ]   <== what did you put in this box?
IP address Range:   192.168.2.x ~ xx
DNS IP Address  [  x ].[ x  ].[ x  ].[ x  ]  <== what did you put here?
                           ^     ^      ^     ^
                            |      |      |      |
                        I do not have this option here......

Below are the options I have:

Static DNS 1: [  ].[  ].[  ].[  ]
Static DNS 2: [  ].[  ].[  ].[  ]
Static DNS 3: [  ].[  ].[  ].[  ]

I have 0.0.0.0 in 1, 2, and 3
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by:lrmoore
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You can put any DNS server IP's in there..
If you have a local server, put that in.
If the ISP gave you two IP's for nameservers, put them in there..

Your wireless clients should only get 192.168.2.100 + as their DHCP assigned address..

What firmware are you using? I have WRV54G with ver 2.36, so there may be some subtle differences

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by:r270ba
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I am using an older firmware v2.0.2 because last time I upgrade my home wrt54g to the newest firmware it messed up my signal strength.....How is the 2.36 for you?

Will my 192.168.2.x clients be able to see the 192.168.1.x network?  

The IP to my DHCP server is 192.168.1.3 (DHCP, DNS, AD, DC, ect)...it is our only "server" in use right now...should I put that in there or the IPs that my ISP gave me?

I am manually have to put DNS IPs into every computer on my network b/c I think I have something setup wrong in AD on my server....will this affect it or can I add the DNS manually and put the 192.168.1.3 as the static dns???
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by:lrmoore
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If your local DNS server has the appropriate "forwarder" addresses, then the private IP of the local DNS server is all you need.

Are you running in "router" mode, or "gateway" mode?

I'm having some issues with the VPN client connecting, but otherwise, no problems after the upgrade.

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by:r270ba
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I just switched it to router mode but I don't know what to set these settings to:

RIP:  [Disabled] ==>Options:  [LAN & WIRELESS]
                                            [WAN (Internet)   ]
                                            [Both                  ]

Destionation LAN IP: [  ].[  ].[  ].[  ]
Subnet Mask: [  ].[  ].[  ].[  ]
Default Gateway: [  ].[  ].[  ].[  ]

Interface: [LAN & WIRELESS] ==>Options: [WAN (Internet)]

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by:lrmoore
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Destionation LAN IP: [ 0 ].[ 0 ].[ 0 ].[ 0 ]
Subnet Mask: [ 0 ].[ 0 ].[ 0 ].[ 0 ]
Default Gateway: [192].[168].[ 1 ].[ 1 ]

Interface [WAN  ]


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by:r270ba
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"The Values You Entered are Invalid"
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by:JonSh
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LOL>..I go to a meeting and the best engineer here takes over, I like it :)

lrmoore, just one note:  
1)I mentioned the inability for 192.168.1.n users to find 192.168.2.n addresses if there is no route in the 192.168.1.n router.  It was even in my first message.  For the first time I actually mentioned a salient point before ya :)

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by:r270ba
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johsh...any ideas on the above?

lrmoore?
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by:lrmoore
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I can't imagine why setting the default gateway through the WAN would result in the error message...
Unfortunately, mine is in production and I can't play around with it too much (I might lose my email and web browsing and then couldn't get back to you to report... d'oh!)

Jon, no dispute that we have a routing issue, but only in "router" mode

Even in Gateway mode (which means it uses NAT to translate all 192.168.2.x addresses to the WAN IP of 192.168.1.x), I'm not 100% sure that we can't access shares or other network services on the 192.168.1.x side. No routing issue here because everything "appears" local because of the NAT. The issue we have in this instance is Netbios name resolution (fixed with WINS/DDNS), and anything that get's initiated on the 192.168.1.x side to a 192.168.2.x client. How often will that happen?

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by:r270ba
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I am not 100% sure of what you are asking....

We do not use Netbios only TCP/IP.

If any 192.168.1.x clients need to access a 192.168.2.x client then that is not a necesity (as long as 192.168.2.x can access 192.168.1.x).  The only time that would happen is if a client needs a file from another client connected wirelessly (192.168.1.x needs file from 192.168.2.x) and in that case we can just move the files need from the 192.168.2.x client over to our fileserver (192.168.1.x) so that the 192.168.1.x client needing the file can access the 192.168.1.x fileserver.

Hope this answers your question.

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by:JonSh
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lrmoore:

I'm thinking it's a non-issue, no reason for a 192.168.1.n machine to try and start a conversation with a 192.168.2.n box.  And why not leave him in gateway mode?  I doubt he has bandwidth restrictions from the Wifi to the current LAN, and so what if they double nat? :)

And i bet he can't set the default route that way because he has to change the LAN IP first, and I bet he hasn't done that yet :)

r270ba, lrmoore and I both basically agree.  Change the LAN address to 192.168.2.1 first, then change the WAN address to 192.168.1.something-you-haven't used-yet, and then maybe do nothing, or at worst case add a route to the ISP router.

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by:r270ba
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Ok I know how to change the LAN address but where do I change the WAN?

Destionation LAN IP: [ 0 ].[ 0 ].[ 0 ].[ 0 ]
Subnet Mask: [ 0 ].[ 0 ].[ 0 ].[ 0 ]
Default Gateway: [192].[168].[ 1 ].[ 1 ]

Interface [WAN  ]

Is it there that I change it?

put 192.168.1.254 or something in the Dest. Lan IP?

I think I have already tried that....I am actually pretty sure I have...I can try it again tomorrow...I have left the office (9:30pm) and am studying for a Math Exam tomorrow at 9am.  It may be thursday before I get back to this ticket since I have another Exam tomorrow night at 7pm...I will keep you updated...

How would I go about setting up a Gateway Mode to do what I am trying to accomplish?
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by:r270ba
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Ok I didn't get time to try it again today (I am studying for my 2nd exam right now) but will be able to check it tomorrow....just an FYI
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by:r270ba
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Alright I have decided that I do not want to divide this up into 192.168.1.x and 192.168.2.x subnets.  The amount of users connecting to the wireless LAN will be minimal and I will just use mac reservations to determine who can access the WLAN.  I want to make it just act as an access poinnt.  I want my DHCP Server to assign the address for all mac connected via the WLAN.  How will I do that?
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JonSh earned 250 total points
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here's the easist way I can think of:
1)ignore the WAN port on the WRT54G
2)connect to it with a workstation and give it a 192.168.1.n LAN address, essentially only to be used for management
3)turn it's DHCP server off
4)connect it to your network with a crossover cable (switch port to switch port)
5)You're ready to go...Configure the wireless the way you want it.
6) Drink heavily (not a required step) :)



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by:r270ba
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So then the "uplink" port should not be used at all?  I would plug my laptop into the switch part of the device and connect to it and give it the IP I want to assign it....then just put a cross over cable from the switch port my laptop is plugged into (or any others...just not the "uplink") to the main switch that will connect it to the network???
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by:lrmoore
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You can use the uplink port with a standard patch cable, any other LAN port with a crossover cable to your LAN switch...
Just don't connect the WAN port to anything.
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by:JonSh
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lrmoore is correct, I think.  I'm just waking up from a nap, but yeah I think the uplink architecture is also a good place to connect and it has the right pinout for a normal patch cable.   You go, lrmoore :)
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by:natcom
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im about to setup a wireless  Linksys WRT54G router for a client only difference is they are not on a  domain or workgroup only a LAN they share internet connections with a Efficient router and a netgear dual speed Hub DS116 16 port the client want me to setup this wireless router so he can go around the office with this laptop with Internet connection and also like me to setup maximum-security im about to open a new question but if anyone like to give me some info as the best way to do this will be totally appreciated



Best regards

natcom
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by:natcom
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i open a new question here http://www.experts-exchange.com/Networking/Q_21187216.html

if anyone like to be part of it
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