HDD not recognized at cold boot after installing new video card

Recently I changed my video card to a new Sapphire Radeon 9800 Pro Atlantis (fanless cooling).

The card needs power supply, so I plugged it to one spare power cable.

From that moment on, randomly, the HDD is not recognized at boot.

First of all I tried a different power cable (the one I choosed had problems?). The problem disappeared, but after 5/10 cold reboots it was still there.

Thinking at a power supply failure (no sufficient power) I unplugged some unnecessary devices (sound card, usb devices). The problem arises again.

Lately, when the HDD is not recognized at boot, I turn off and the on again the computer and finally the drive is recognized.

1. Is the HDD dying and the problem is not related to the new video card?
2. Is the video card conflicting with the HDD?
3. Is it a power supply problem?
4. Can it be a temperature problem (since it's fanless, I guess the temperature inside is getting hot, but I'm probing it and it seems that it never goes beyond 40'Celsius).

axsaxsAsked:
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jcarnevaleConnect With a Mentor Commented:
My idea is that you need a new power supply.  They are cheap and easy to install.   Like the first poster mentioned, the new video cards are now pulling some serious current.  My guess is that : Your current power supply can't handle all of your devices now that you have added a power hog
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Cyber-DudeCommented:
Did you try to diable the power unit from the VGA adapter and restrat your computer? did you hear any drive spinnings?

Cyber
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Steve McCarthy, MCSE, MCSA, MCP x8, Network+, i-Net+, A+, CIWA, CCNA, FDLE FCIC, HIPAA Security OfficerIT Consultant, Network Engineer, Windows Network Administrator, VMware AdministratorCommented:
If you go back to the old video card, does the problem go away??   The newer video cards can pull some serious current so if putting the old card back fixes the problem, then I would see about possibly replacing the power supply with a beefier one.  If the problem persists with the old card, then look at a failing hard drive as teh problem.

Steve
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axsaxsAuthor Commented:

Cyber, disabling the power unit from the new video card is not an option, since the PC won't boot (a warning appears telling you that you MUST plug in the card to the power supply unit).

Steve, I'll keep the "remount the old video card" as a last option, since I must reinstall the other graphic drivers (nVidia)....

Any other idea?





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Cyber-DudeCommented:
I know about  the warnings... I just wanted to know if you hear any disk spins. If you want to be sure it is power than, try to disable all units leaving the disk and the VGA adaper (i.e. disable CD/Floppy/Remove any NIC/Modem like PCI controllers).

Cyber
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huntersvcsCommented:
I've heard that some ASUS Motherboards have problems with the ATI9800.  Check the manufacturer's website for compatibility information.  You might need BIOS or driver (AGP, not Graphic) updates.  Additionally, see if the BIOS has a boot setting for AGP/PCI and switch to PCI during boot.  The AGP will then first kick in when the OS starts and not at the very beginning.

Hope this helps.
Rick
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tosh9iiiCommented:
Make sure that the IDE cables are in all the way.  
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axsaxsAuthor Commented:

I think you are right, jcarnevale. I just ckecked out: my power supply is 125W max. I guess I must buy a 300W one. One question: are the dimensions of a power supply unit standard (on an ATX case?)?

- tosh: the cables are just ok.
- hunter: I'll go and check. My boot setting was PCI. I turned to AGP and that (of course!) did not solved the problem.

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Cyber-DudeCommented:
Yap!

Any dont buy a 300W, I think you shoud go for the 500W (it is not a big difference in price).

Cyber
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jcarnevaleCommented:
Not really sure if the dimensions are all the same.  Since you are adding a new one, just bring the old one with you so you can't get the wrong one.  Good Luck!  And yes, get the 500w so you don't run into this again.
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Steve McCarthy, MCSE, MCSA, MCP x8, Network+, i-Net+, A+, CIWA, CCNA, FDLE FCIC, HIPAA Security OfficerIT Consultant, Network Engineer, Windows Network Administrator, VMware AdministratorCommented:
Power Supply, yes I'll buy that.  BTW did you overlook that suggestion in my first post?  I'm just wondering why you awarded the points to someone else who made the same suggestion later on, quoting part of what I said in his answer.
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axsaxsAuthor Commented:

Steve, you suggest to pull out the new card and TRY to see if it was power supply. I appreciated the "sure bet" by jcarnevale, he said: it's surely the power supply, and he was right. A subtle difference, but decisive to me.

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Steve McCarthy, MCSE, MCSA, MCP x8, Network+, i-Net+, A+, CIWA, CCNA, FDLE FCIC, HIPAA Security OfficerIT Consultant, Network Engineer, Windows Network Administrator, VMware AdministratorCommented:
OK, I accept your reasoning, however I don't agree with it.  This is why. That's called Easter Egg Troubleshooting which is basically to take stabs at what might be the problem.  I presented a logical troubleshooting method, which if followed, would have eliminated the new video card as the problem first and establish that something else coincidentally had not started acting up with your system. This does happen all the time in Electronics.  The next step was the power supply and that would have fixed the problem.  From the symptoms you presented, this was text book troubleshooting.  Just a week ago I pulled a brand new flakey Radeon X800 video card out of the box and after 5 minutes or so my screen would blank and I had to power cycle the PC.  Video Card or Power Supply???  It was the Video Card.

Look at it this way...  You go into the doctor and say that you just started been taking a vitamin suppliment and now you have bad pains in your side.  The doctor says, Well, first don't use the new suppliment, go back to your old one and see if the problem clears up.  That will eliminate the new suppliment as the problem and/or point us to the next logical possibility, unfortunately that involves surgery.

You see another doctor and he says, Lets go do Surgery.  No Tests, No troubleshooting of your problem, but a "Guess".

Wouldn't you rather try the cheap, least labor intensive task first which is also takes you back to a known working and stable state?  If you would have looked at our profiles, you would have seen my background and experience, so I do know how to troubleshoot.

For jcarnvale, it was a good guess and worked for you.  This place is all about learning and I think we all did some here with everyone's inputs.

Anyway, that's just my opinion, but in the future, I think you should consider these issues when you present problems and people give their time and effort troubleshooting and working for resolution.  If you have any questions, look at EE's guidelines for awarding points.  It spells it out pretty well there.

Thanks
Steve
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