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Pattern based DNS entry

Posted on 2004-10-06
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Whenever a URL is typed with a extension of .mirror.sytes.org the request is directed to 62.3.254.150 i.e www.google.com.mirror.sytes.org, www.yahoo.com.mirror.sytes.org. And in this site they provide the mirror image of the original site. Hows is it possible to have the DNS return a particular IP for URLs ends with a string .mirror.sytes.org. Is there any concept like pattern based DNS entry?
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Question by:jacobselvin
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by:The--Captain
ID: 12246330
Wildcard DNS is done all the time - for another example type your.name.isgay.com - I apologize in advance if that example offends anyone - it's the first example I can think of off the top of my head aside from Verisign's Sitefinder (which has thankfully been disabled, hopefully for good)

While bind 9 from ISC (Internet Systems Consortium) has no difficulties handling DNS wildcards, I am uncertain as to whether or not Microsoft DNS/AD would readily do this.

Hope that helps.

Cheers,
-Jon
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by:jacobselvin
ID: 12255030
Hi Jon,
    Does it mean that when a URL is submitted to a DNS Server it first tries to match it with some patterns ( like *.mirror.sytes.org, *.isgay.com ) and if it's not able to find a one then it'll look for a exact match and returns the corresponding IP address. Any idea how such entries are made into DNS server?
Thanx,
- Jacob
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The--Captain earned 750 total points
ID: 12256645
>Does it mean that when a URL is submitted to a DNS Server it first tries to match it with some patterns ( like *.mirror.sytes.org,
>*.isgay.com ) and if it's not able to find a one then it'll look for a exact match and returns the corresponding IP address?

Actually, I think it moves from a most-specific to less-specific (as most pattern matchers attempt to do), which would be opposite of your description above.

>Any idea how such entries are made into DNS server?

In bind, you simply add an asterisk (*) in your zone file to match anything, i.e.

*.example.com.     IN     MX      5 mail.example.com.

or in your in-addr.arpa zone file

*         IN      PTR   too-lazy-to-configure-reverse-dns.example.com.

Cheers,
-Jon

P.S.  Try googling "bind dns wildcard" (without the quotes) to find out more about this...
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