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About Opening the files , which on windows

Posted on 2004-10-06
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I have installed Fedora & Windows XP on same computer . Can I open the file of other drive on Fedora .The Fedora is in F drive  & Windows is in C drive.If I can open the files ,how.I have very less knoladge about linux .
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Question by:ashish12
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Expert Comment

by:Luxana
ID: 12246416
what do you mean that fedora is on F drive?
what kind of filesystem you are using on fedora?

You can see windows partitions from linux but you can't see linux partions from windows.

try post here output of command
# fdisk -l
from fedora.
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by:blkline
ID: 12247557
From Linux you'll be able to access your WinXP files (read only, I think) but with a stock XP system you won't be able to see your Linux files from Windows.

I can't tell exactly what parition your 'C' drive is,  but assuming that it is your first your could do this on your Linux box, while logged on as root:

mkdir /mnt/C
mount -t ntfs /dev/hda1 /mnt/C

If that doesn't work then you'll need to do an:

fdisk -l /dev/hda

and determine from there which partition to mount on /mnt/C.

Barry
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by:avizit
ID: 12250764
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Accepted Solution

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rameshbhaskar earned 400 total points
ID: 12305236
It is very much possible to access your Windows files from your Linux System. First, drives in linux are not deteremined by a drive letter, for instance there is no such thing as F drive on linux. I'm assuming that you had many partitions in windows and hence used one of the partitions (named your F drive) to install linux.

Now for accessing your windows files, you would first have to create a directory where you can mount them. For example, mkdir /mnt/c.

Then type fdisk -l /dev/hda (assuming that you have installed it on that disk, otherwise hdb,hdc or hdd).

In the output of that, there will be a listing of your partitions (hda1, hda2, hda3, etc..) some of which will be of type FAT32. You will have to recognise which of them is your drive which you want to access (c,d,e,f). After noting the name, hda1/hda2/hda3 or something.. then u type in

mount -t [vfat|ntfs] /dev/hda<partition number> /mnt/<directory name>

Ex: mount -t vfat /dev/hda2 /mnt/c

Then you can access your files.

If it wasn't that partition then you can just unmount it using the umount /mnt/c command.

If you want to access your linux files from linux there is a software called Explore2fs which might be able to help you.
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