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Looking to share internet with my Son who lives next door? Any help would be appreciated!

Posted on 2004-10-10
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Last Modified: 2013-11-30
Hi

I wanted to know, if possible, how let my son share our household's cable internet connection, he lives next door to us. I have an available computer to use for a server, I just don't know how to configure it to work for this situation. And if there is any proxy software to use that would assign separate IP adresses, I would appreciate any and all input.

Also, we would prefer to do this wired as want to use our gigabit lan to transfer files. We already have the cable connecting the two homes, so that is not an issue. Thanks,
Kevin
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Question by:looking916
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Gary Dewrell earned 250 total points
ID: 12273206
Hi looking916,
The easiest thing to do would be to purchase a low cost 4 port router like a linksys or dlink, or netgear. This would provide dhcp and routing for your other computers.

Now that being said, I feel I must also advise you that depending on you internet provider, what you are wanting to do, may violate your ISP's internet usage policy.


God Bless
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Expert Comment

by:TRobertson
ID: 12273550
The easiest would be a wireless router if you are within a close enough range, however if you are within 300 ft and don't mind running cable I would recommend connecting via cat5 ethernet due to its increased performance.  You will need a router/hub/switch behind the broadband modem an if you would like multiple network devices at the second location you will need a hub/switch there.  What is your distance between your potential network devices?
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Expert Comment

by:Shinru
ID: 12273890
You mentioned you already have cable run from each of the buildings so I would recommend going with that. Wireless would be the easiest but you would see decreased network performance (you're expecting to share files across the LAN is sounds like, so wireless wouldn't be a good way to go in that aspect), and you would have the issue of security to deal with. So, if you have a means of using cable already, by all means use it. However if you're planning on using gigabit for your LAN, not necessarily any router will do, you'll have to get one that supports 10/100/1000 mbit. Hope that helps out a little.
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Expert Comment

by:bdmartin116
ID: 12273986
if your extra computer is running windows xp, you could try using internet connection sharing and route your son's computer through that

To start the Network Setup Wizard, click Start, click Control Panel, and then double-click Network Setup Wizard.
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Expert Comment

by:bigwave2
ID: 12274548
Personally, I would suggest using an old PC (PII or up) and IPCop (http://www.ipcop.org) to create a hardware firewall.

This allows you to have greater control over the firewall functionality.

You can also add functionality through "add ons" which would let you add content filtering email scanning etc.
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by:stevegw62
ID: 12276510
If it were me I would not hesitate in using a wireless "g" network card for the remote pc and a wireless router with Url control,firewall,Vpn and a few other handy features such as the Netcomm 5580w. I would then cable the Host pc to the router for that little extra dependability. And keep in mind even though  you are already cabled to each other and thinking of using Gigabit lan. That the chances of you needing more than about 10-20 Mbps are extremely remote therefore the 54 that wireless "g" gives you will be more than enough even for large amounts of data. I have cutomers with seperated buildings of 25 pcs both sites that use 54g bridges and no complaints. And besides it will free you up from being physically stuck to a wall socket and give you the opportunity to change and rearrange as much as you want.
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Expert Comment

by:Shinru
ID: 12279033
However, you should also take into consideration that if you do go wireless, even with an 802.11g setup you'll really only be receiving about 27mbps throughput (about half of what g, claims, 54mbps). Factor in the distance and it could go even lower than that. Furthermore, I would say not to even bother with something like Netgear's "108mbps Super G" system, since as far as most tests I've seen, hasn't really acheived an incredible amount of more throughput.
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Expert Comment

by:Marakush
ID: 12279607
gdewrell is correct! If you have the cable run already, then just pick up a cheapo router:

http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProduct.asp?Submit=list&catalog=145&DEPA=0&Order=priceD&CMP=KNC-600673key

It will assign IP addresses (DHCP) and act as a NAT for your internet connection. This way you keep the speed, don't really have to worry to much about being sniffed, and have a much more reliable internet connection / network connection.

As for the old PC you can do two things if your feeling up to it.

Load it up with Linux (Too many very nice distros to mention one over the others personal choice here)  As bigwave2 put it, load up  IPCop (http://www.ipcop.org) it will give you a greater amount of control over a real firewall not just a NAT. Oh one thing if you go that route (Which is fun and fustrating at the same time) you also need to add another NIC (network card) to the old computer.

Okay that's about it, good luck...

Marakush
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by:holger12345
ID: 12279800
Please don't buy a gigabit router for your home LAN (as it was suggested before once) - as you'll probably have maximum of 2MBit/sec (and that is a lot!) you will never exceed 10MBit/sec on the way to and from your ISP!
I'd prefer a standard 4-port router with the option to use wireless (but i wouldn't connect the PCs wireless) if i had a flatrate connection.
But imagine if you have a time-payed DSL connection: the router will go up on every single DNS-call that the god of Microsoft has build in (so it is on my site ;-) ). Then you want to switch-off the connection the hard way.... if you switch of the router, also the built-in switch goes down and you have no connection with your son to exchange files and play games internally.
Then you should use a DSL-modem with a switch behind or you just get another switch to connect to the router, where you then connect your equipment in.

All those statements about wireless - think about them, they are true... just use it in case you want to expand your network with a notebook, where wireless is a nice option

Good luck
Holger
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Expert Comment

by:Shinru
ID: 12280038
I'm sorry, perhaps I was misunderstood. Granted, like Holger said, you won't get more than 2mbps from your ISP, but you said that you would like to use gigabit to transfer files across your LAN, which is why I suggested looking for a router with a switch that supports the gigabit. But if you don't plan on transfering large files or large amounts of files QUITE often, it probably wouldn't constitute paying the extra for gigabit support. Sorry if I was misunderstood.
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Expert Comment

by:Marakush
ID: 12286366
I understood it as they wanted to transfer files between each other on their own network.

"Also, we would prefer to do this wired as want to use our gigabit lan to transfer files. We already have the cable connecting the two homes, so that is not an issue. Thanks,
Kevin"

Either way Kevin, you have many options all which are good. Let us know how it goes.

Marakush
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Expert Comment

by:Format19
ID: 12290724
Check out http://www.freesco.info/

It is a Linux based Firewall/Router/DHCP/DNS/everything

Extremely powerful.
We use it in work
It is running on a PI 166Mhz with 32Mb of EDO ram.
Two network cards and a floppy (nothing else in machine)
The best thing is you create a boot disk for it and it loads the whole lot in to memory and runs from there this way it cannot be hacked and nothing can be edited.

It is very easy to setup just walk through the questions during setup.
The website is very helpful

This I think would be the cheapist, easiest and most secure

also good point made about breach of usage polocy from ISP?

Format19
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Author Comment

by:looking916
ID: 12291764
I am running windows XP pro, I have the Netgear 108 Mbps router with 4 ports. The network setup is easy, I just don't know how to set it up so that our homes would be seperate "network entities" but we could share the same internet, Seperate household IP's, that is.

I can pay for the extra ip address from my provider if needed.

Thanks for all the help!!!
Kevin
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Author Comment

by:looking916
ID: 12291834
"Note"
I am still learning this site. I thought I was grading the advice, all of which was great, but I still have my same issue. If I need to post more points for support with this request, please advise. Thanks,
Kevin
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Expert Comment

by:Marakush
ID: 12291876
looking916,

Okay well you do not need seperate IP addresses, you just have to use a public IP address block.

192.168.1/24 (192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.254)

If you want a seperate IP address block from your ISP you would have to have a router (not the netgear) between the networks to route the IP traffic between segments.

Just using the built in DHCP of the router you use to connect to your ISP should be okay using the address space:

192.168.1.1 for the router

192.168.1.10 for your computer

192.168.1.20 for your son's computer.

Marakush
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Expert Comment

by:Format19
ID: 12292639
yes but the two homes would not then be seperate entities

If you have a spare machine put three network cards in it and install FreeSCO.
Have Home #1 in address range 192.168.1.1
Have Home #2 in address range 192.168.0.1
and have the third network card in whatever address range your isp needs to connect.

you could also have an address range such as 10.0.0.1 and 10.0.1.1

On the points note I am only new here aswell I believe your supposed to award points for the answer wich helped you?

Format19
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Author Comment

by:looking916
ID: 12292647
Marakush,
Would you recommend any particular router, or what to shop for? Also with your configuration, does each computer display a different IP address to the internet? I just don't want to share the IP address that my ISP has issued.
Kevin
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Expert Comment

by:Format19
ID: 12292674
ok
In our office the ISP has assigned us the address 192.168.1.1 for use in whatever router we which to use.

The rest of our internal network is 192.168.0.1 /24
the FreeSCO router has 2 x network cards
when has ip of 192.168.0.12 and the other has 192.168.1.2(this one is plugged into our broadband)
The FreeSCO setup is set to route traffic from on to the other, all internal machines look to 192.168.0.12 as their default gateway
Format19
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Expert Comment

by:TRobertson
ID: 12296777
You isp will assign your modem an ip (probably via DHCP, meaning the ip will often change), with the right configuration sometimes you can pass this ip through to your router.  Therefor your router now has an outside ip address.  On you LAN side of the router you can usually use just about any ip numbering convention you choose.  Most people use a 192.168.x subnet with a mask of 255.255.255.0.  Your router will be the gateway, (meaning any traffic non-LAN related with get sent here).

Most home users will recommend a Linksys router, you can find there 802.11g wireless routers with 4 port hub for under $50.  I have also used d-link and netgear but I prefer the interface of the linksys over the two.
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by:Marakush
ID: 12297874
looking916,

Okay if you use the same router with the configuration that said. Yes they will have the same IP address on the net.

    [Internet]---[ISP]--[Router]---[YourComputer]
                                    |
                                    |
                          [SonsComputer]

With this your router will have an IP address assigned by your ISP for arguments sake lets say is 200.100.50.25

Your IP address 192.168.1.10
Your son's IP address is 192.168.1.20
Your computer and son's computer will use the same gateway (the routers internal address) 192.168.1.1
Your router's internal IP address (The one that is facing your internal network) 192.168.1.1
All devices will share subnet 255.255.255.0 (Internally)

Now your ISP will assign your DSL/Cable modem an IP address (made up address) 200.100.50.25

When you go out to the internet you and your son's computer will becoming from the same IP address 200.100.50.25

There is really no problem doing this, unless one of you is doing something naughty :)


------------------


You can request a small block of address from your ISP, so let's say you have DSL, you can request 8 IP addresses. Doing this you will probely have to upgrade your DSL modem, then have the ISP configure the new router for you to use those addresses.

After that its the same as above but just assign the IP Addresses that your ISP gave to you to your router, your machine your son's machine.


-------------------

But for something simple which I really recommend, just use my suggestion above and go out on the same address, if its just for internet access.

-------------------

As for a router. Sure there are a lot of decent home routers on the market. Here is a list of a few. At my house I use a Netgear router and a Linksys router. (The netgear is for my mac)

http://www.nextag.com/serv/main/buyer/OutPDir.jsp?search=netgear+router&x=0&y=0&node=0

Good router, decent price.

http://www.nextag.com/Netgear_MR814_4_Port~64371792z0znzzz1zznetgear_routerzmainz2-htm

Okay, hope this helps you out.

Marakush



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Author Comment

by:looking916
ID: 12340487
Thanks for the help everybody. I am now in the process of setting it up. Sorry for the delay, a small emergency came up. Thanks again,
Kevin
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Expert Comment

by:holger12345
ID: 12345336
looking: one question - you do accept the first answer, but you place 4 comments with questions two days after that answer! Would you mind telling me/us, why you didn't gave some of the hard thinking people any assistant points? Thats no offense from me, just my 2 cents...

regards Holger
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Author Comment

by:looking916
ID: 12376451
Holger12345,
Sorry for the confusion, I posted earlier that I thought I was grading each response, and considering everybody helped me I was trying to be fair. I also stated that I was new to the site and I was sorry for the mistake. That response is on 10-12-04, so it would be easier to find. -Kevin
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