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Cisco 3550 SMI PWR Switch

Posted on 2004-10-11
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Last Modified: 2008-03-03
Whats is the best way to uplink a Cisco 3550 SMI PWR Switch?
What is the purpose of GBIC?
One of my client bought 5 units of the above switch and five units of 1000 Base T GBIC..now they have ordered five more... what could be the reason?
Since it's a POWER Switch does that mean the IP phones won;t be needing any power cord? (since it draws power from the switch?) DO we have to consider about the power supply for the Switches?
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Question by:HolySinD3vil
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by:lrmoore
lrmoore earned 150 total points
ID: 12278085
The GBIC provdes the appropriate Layer 1 physical connectivity. You choose the medium - multimode fiber, singlemode fiber, or in this case, CAT5/6 cable.

>now they have ordered five more... what could be the reason?
5 more what? GBICs? Maybe they bought the wrong type?

>Whats is the best way to uplink a Cisco 3550 SMI PWR Switch?
Through the GBIC's or if they are in the same rack, use Gigastack modules instead of GBIC's

Yes, with power provided over the cat5 cable, the IP phones won't need any external power supply. Same with Wireless access points and any other Ethernet devices that can draw their power from the switch.
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by:
Dr-IP earned 100 total points
ID: 12278134
The PWR means the switch will power phones, or wireless access points over the Ethernet connections if they support that feature. The power supply for this is in the switch, so nothing else is needed to take advantage of this feature other than phones, or access points that can make use of it.

As for stacking, that’s what the GBIC’s are for, they are for gigabit fiber connection between the switches. I suspect after they had everything in hand they realized that it wasn’t going to work with just 5 since you daisy change the switches together when you stack them through the GBIC’s, and at the minimum for 5 switches you need eight of them. One for each of the ends, and two for the three in the middle, but the best way is to make a loop, which is probably the reason they ordered an additional five GBIC’s. That way if something happens to one of the switches, it won’t break the chain and split the network in half since every switch will have two paths between them.  


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Author Comment

by:HolySinD3vil
ID: 12278366
Irmoore

>Whats is the best way to uplink a Cisco 3550 SMI PWR Switch?
Through the GBIC's or if they are in the same rack, use Gigastack modules instead of GBIC's
----> you are trying to say that GBIC is used for uplink the switches?. Whats the difference between Gigastack and GBIC? Whats would be your recommendation?

>now they have ordered five more... what could be the reason?
5 more what? GBICs? Maybe they bought the wrong type?
----> Yup they have ordered 5 more GBIC Nope Irmoore they have ordered the same model again WS G 5483 1000 Base T


DR- IP

Your explanation is quite good as well...(no offense Irmoore :)...still I like your explanation as well).  You said that the best way for stacking is to make a loop...how it could be done? or shall I ask how to do it :)
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by:lrmoore
lrmoore earned 150 total points
ID: 12278478
You can uplink the switches like this:

   Switch1  -23      24
                  |          |----|
   Switch2  -23   24        |
                         |         |
  Switch3  -23   24         |  last switch "loops back"  up to the first switch.
                  |                |
  Switch4  -23   24        |
                         |         |
 Switch5  -23   24          |
                 |--------------|

If they ordered 5 more of the same, then it is simply (as Dr-IP noted) that they did not have enough because you need 2 in each switch.

The Gigastack is a different kind of GBIC that has two interfaces on it (and uses its own special cable) so that you can create this same connectivity, but only using one port of each router.
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by:Dr-IP
Dr-IP earned 100 total points
ID: 12278800
Irmoore’s description is what I mean by a loop, below is a link with diagrams for the Gigastack, but it’s the same idea when using two GBIC’s instead. I based my explanation based on what your customer had ordered. Although you can do the same thing only 5 Gigastack adaptors, but if you want to throw another switch in there that doesn’t support it, you are out of luck, which is why I like the GBIC route better myself. Also I suspect you’ll get higher performance using the fiber GBIC’s instead of the Gigastack adaptors, since you split the bandwidth between two ports unlike you do with the GBIC’s, but in the end unless you are mixing switch’s either should be OK.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/modules/ps872/products_data_sheet09186a00800a1789.html 
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Author Comment

by:HolySinD3vil
ID: 12278888
Can I stack 2 Cisco 3550 switch ( leave out this 2 for now) with 1 unit of 3Com unmanaged Switch and 2 units of 3 Com Hubs? Can I like connect it directly using normal Cat5 at port 24 connecting it directly to the Cisco Switch since there is no GBIC port in those 3COM switch/hub
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LVL 79

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by:lrmoore
lrmoore earned 150 total points
ID: 12278934
Yes, you can connect any switch directly to the 3550 on any port that is NOT GBIC. If you want to use the 1000BT GBIC, you can connect to another switch ONLY if it is a Gigabit port. Save the GBIC's to uplink only between 3550's.
Note that you must use a crossover Ethernet cable between normal 10/100 interfaces on the 3550 and any other switch/hub device.
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