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Network Application Question

Posted on 2004-10-11
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Hello!

Ok, im really new to this, so i need some help just being pointed in the right direction so that I can research it.

I've seen networks that give out permission to certian applictions based on domian log in.

For example, user A logs in and has access to the entire office suite, and certian programs. When user b logs in to the domain, they do not get the other programs.
I know this can be done locally, but i'm talking a network of 5000 computers. At any computer, the user A has access to those programs (and their personal files). How does this happen? I know that all these programs are not installed on each computer, so its as if the server is installing them per sesson.... I'm just confused... is this Terminal Services? or something else?

What is this called and where do i find info on it?

Thanks!

Bick
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Question by:bick2000
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scampgb earned 500 total points
ID: 12278915
Hi bick2000,

You're *sure* the applications aren't installed locally and you just can't see them?

There are two things that could be happening here - one is terminal services and the other is that the applications are actually being installed on the fly.

I'd bet that it's Terminal Services.  It would be a logical solution in the environment you describe.

As for how it's done, there (once again!) are a few options.
It could be done with group policies in the OUs.  These can be configured to show restricted desktops and only allow you to see the icons for the applications you're supposed to access.
The other way is to use a security group to restrict who can access the application executable files.

Basically, there's a few ways you can go about doing the above - which is the most appropriate depends on your environment.

Does that help?

If you'd like more info, can you please explain a little more about what you're trying to achieve?
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by:scampgb
ID: 12278929
Hi bick2000,

I just responded to your other question : http://www.experts-exchange.com/Networking/Q_21163898.html#0 "Network Application Question".  I suggest you ask the Mods to delete one or the other.

Anyway, this is what I posted:


You're *sure* the applications aren't installed locally and you just can't see them?

There are two things that could be happening here - one is terminal services and the other is that the applications are actually being installed on the fly.

I'd bet that it's Terminal Services.  It would be a logical solution in the environment you describe.

As for how it's done, there (once again!) are a few options.
It could be done with group policies in the OUs.  These can be configured to show restricted desktops and only allow you to see the icons for the applications you're supposed to access.
The other way is to use a security group to restrict who can access the application executable files.

Basically, there's a few ways you can go about doing the above - which is the most appropriate depends on your environment.

Does that help?

If you'd like more info, can you please explain a little more about what you're trying to achieve?
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by:scampgb
ID: 12278932
Oops - ignore that second post, it was meant for your other question :-)
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by:bick2000
ID: 12279077
So it does have to do with Terminal Services....

I think thats a good start... do you have any links about terminal Services other than MS website (that doesn't help much in understanding how it works)?

Thanks!

Bick
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by:scampgb
ID: 12279101
Well, the obvious place to start would be http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/technologies/terminal/default.asp

... you could also take a look at http://terminal.servebeer.com/ but that might be a bit more indepth.

Is there anything in particular you're finding difficult to understand?
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by:bick2000
ID: 12279146
Well, i dont know... I have WS2k3... and was wondering about the deployment of certian apps, since the computers that they will use i cant handle like Office 2003.... is that then done through Terminal Services? I dont know, just want to get a better understanding of all of the 2003 features... (other than ad and file storage! ;) )

Thanks for your help

Bick
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by:scampgb
ID: 12279302
bick2000:
It sounds like TS would be ideal for you.  One of the benefits is that the software is running on your server and not on the client PCs.
This means that you can use PCs that wouldn't normally be up to the job, or even dedicated terminals.

You really do need to look at the planning & deployment guides on the MS website.  What needs to happen will depend a lot on your infrastructure and number of clients.

Basically, under TS the applications (well, everything) runs on your TS server.  The only thing that runs on the client PC is the program that connects it to the server.  You can even do that with a webpage if going to the clients is too much like hard work :-)
The server exchanges keyboard, mouse movements and screen update data with the client.

You need to bear in mind that everything is running on your TS box.  
If it breaks, no-one can do anything.
If there's a problem with the installation of an application, if affects everyone.
If someone (with appropriate permissions) does something stupid to the machine, it affects everyone.

TS is a great solution to application deployment and can be put to great effect in extending the life of your desktop PCs.  As they fail, you can look into replacing them with dedicated terminals - these have the benefit of being inexpensive, reliable and hassle-free.

All that said, TS can be expensive - the licencing needs to be done properly and you need to make sure that your server(s) are up to the job.
You also need to plan it well - if you install everything correctly the first time it'll save you loads of hassle in the long run.

My best advice would be to get hold of an old machine and play around with it.  It'll be slow, but will give you an idea of what you need to do.
When implementing any system I generally build it on a desktop machine so that I know I've got it right, write down exactly what needs to happen and in what order, and then do it on the real server.  That way you can play around with configs while you're learning and not end up with a live system that's been messed around with.

Hope that this helps.
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by:scampgb
ID: 12279331
bick2000:
> get a better understanding of all of the 2003 features

One last thing - if you need this then you're best going on a training course or looking at some books like http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0735619530/pd_ka_0/026-5885141-3081221

Now I'm going to commit heresy and say that computers are only worthwhile if they're used to do something practical.  Work out what you want to achieve, then look for the technology to do the job.  Doing things the other way round can end up with technically beautiful solutions that don't actually do what people need.
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by:bick2000
ID: 12279386
Makes complete sense...

Thanks for the help....

Bick
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by:scampgb
ID: 12279408
Glad I could help - best of luck with the project :-)

If you have any further questions, just ask.
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