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Mount NTFS Drive - Permission Denied to Open

I am trying to find a way to mount my NTFS drive under my standard user ID.  I can mount it and access it under root with no problems.  When I mount it under my standard user ID I don't have sufficient permissions to view the contents of the drive.  I have tried to change the permissions of the device by typing chmod 666 /dev/hda, but that didn't fix the issue.  I don't have to access data very often, but it is very inconvenient to log in as root just to access a file.
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aaeandcee
Asked:
aaeandcee
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1 Solution
 
LuxanaCommented:
Hi

One is that you need to configure /etc/fstab
For example entry in my /etc/fstab :
/dev/hda4          /mnt/ntfs                            ntfs           noauto,users               0     0

cause mount and unmount  /dev/hda4 for all users.
so

option users allows any user to mount and unmount the filesystem.
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LuxanaCommented:
just for more info about how to mount NTFS here is link:

http://www.justlinux.com/nhf/Filesystems/Mounting_NTFS_Filesystems.html
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aaeandceeAuthor Commented:
I can successfully mount the drive, what I am having problems doing is gaining access to the mount folder.  The message I get as an ordinary user is:  

"The folder contents could not be displayed"  "You do not have the permissions necessary to view the contents of "ntfs".

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LuxanaCommented:
what is you absolute path for mounting ntfs partition?

make sure that your users have parmition in parrent directories as well !! When you get into mounted directory like root to who belongs files and directories?
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aaeandceeAuthor Commented:
I've tried creating the mount point under /home/myname/ntfs as well as /mnt/ntfs and both have given me denied messages.  
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LuxanaCommented:
for mount use command :

# mount /dev/hdaX -t ntfs -o ro,users,umask=0007,gid=1000 /mnt/ntfs

or

/etc/fstab options like this?

ro,user,noauto,umask=0007,gid=1000

so whole line will look like :

/dev/hdaX       /mnt/ntfs      ntfs    ro,users,noauto,umask=0007,gid=1000        0       0


then

#mount /mnt/ntfs

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aaeandceeAuthor Commented:
I still can't access the drive.  
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LuxanaCommented:
paste here exactly what you doing and output from
# fdisk -l
and also error message what you get when you attempt accese mountet ntfs filesystem.
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aaeandceeAuthor Commented:
The line in the FSTAB that references the NTFS drive is exactly as follows:
/dev/hda1             /mnt/ntfs                  ntfs    ro,users,noauto,umask=0007,gid=1000      0 0

I have created a directory under /mnt named ntfs

From a comand prompt I issue mount /mnt/ntfs

When I go to access the drive I get the following error:

"The folder contents could not be displayed"  "You do not have the permissions necessary to view the contents of "ntfs"

If I log in as root I have full access to the drive, but when I log in as an ordinary user I am able to map but unable to access.

The fdisk command refuses to run under my user account.
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aaeandceeAuthor Commented:
I logged in as root and was able to execute the fdisk command.

[root@localhost root]# fdisk -l
 
Disk /dev/hda: 80.0 GB, 80026361856 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9729 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
 
   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/hda1               1        9729    78148161    7  HPFS/NTFS
 
Disk /dev/hdb: 30.7 GB, 30736613376 bytes
16 heads, 63 sectors/track, 59556 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 1008 * 512 = 516096 bytes
 
   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/hdb1               1       59556    30016192+  83  Linux
 
Disk /dev/sda: 122.9 GB, 122942324736 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 14946 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
 
   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *           1        3315    26627706    7  HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda2            3316       13004    77826892+   7  HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda3           13005       13017      104422+  83  Linux
/dev/sda4           13018       14946    15494692+   f  W95 Ext'd (LBA)
/dev/sda5           13018       14692    13454406   83  Linux
/dev/sda6           14693       14946     2040223+  82  Linux swap
 
Disk /dev/sde: 8 MB, 8110080 bytes
2 heads, 16 sectors/track, 495 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 32 * 512 = 16384 bytes
 
   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sde1   *           1         494        7891+   1  FAT12
[root@localhost root]#

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LuxanaCommented:
did try get in to /mnt/ntfs directory like normal user before you mount ntfs filesystem? try if you have read read write permitions.
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LuxanaCommented:
hi

this permitions problems appears only with ntfs filesystem?
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aaeandceeAuthor Commented:
Yes, I have full read and write ability to the folder--just tested it.

Yes, only with the NTFS partition.  I have a memory card and memory stick drive (both formatted with fat), as well as an ext3 formatted drive.  I can access all those drives with no problems.
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LuxanaCommented:
try different umask for other read and write:

# mount /dev/hdaX -t ntfs -o ro,users,umask=0000,gid=1000 /mnt/ntfs  

and also try without gid

# mount /dev/hdaX -t ntfs -o ro,users,umask=0000 /mnt/ntfs  



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