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Static IP Address Does Not Allow Access to Certain Websites but DHCP Address Does

Hello Experts,

I have a Windows ME machine, with 256 MB of RAM, and plenty of hard disk space.  This machine is on a network with one other machine.  I have a DSL connection, with an Actiontech Wireless Modem/Router attached (wireless disabled).  I have a static IP address of 10.0.0.201, subnet of 255.255.255.0.  My other machine gets its IP address from the Actiontech Wireless Modem/Router DHCP server.  The static IP address is to have access the 10.0.0.201 machine from an off-site location.  I configured the Modem/Router to allow me to put in a public IP in pcAnywhere and connect to the 10.0.0.201 machine by using port forwarding.  This worked great for a few months, and then all of a sudden, I could not get to key websites as long as I had the static IP address assigned.  When I change it to DHCP, I can get to the key websites.  But, if I use DHCP, I cannot use pcAnywhere from an off-site location to connect.  Do you have any ideas of what could possibly be going on?  

I have done a full virus scan, I have rebuilt the system from scratch, and still, I have this problem.  I have double-checked the settings in the Modem and they are correct.  Any ideas would greatly be appreciated.

Thanks.

Peggy

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PeggyPitchford
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PeggyPitchford
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1 Solution
 
masterbakerCommented:
You should compare your DNS server settings on the DHCP enabled machine with those on your statically assigned machine.

To find your DNS settings on the DHCP enabled machines, follow these commands:

Windows 95/98/ME
- Start -> Run -> winipcfg
- View all settings (might be the advanced button, I forget) and write down the DNS servers assigned (could be 2-3 entries)

Windows 2000/XP
- Start -> Run -> cmd.exe
- Type in 'ipconfig /all' and record the DNS server settings

Now take this information and compare it with the DNS server on your static IP box.  That's most likely the problem.  If not, please post back.

Jeff
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PeggyPitchfordAuthor Commented:
Thanks, Jeff.  I will check it out and let you know.

Peggy
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Fatal_ExceptionCommented:
I agree.. it sounds like DNS to me.  One way to be sure though is to enter the IP address of the site you are trying to visit instead of the 'FriendlyName.com'...  For instance, instead of using www.yahoo.com, use  216.109.118.67  If you can now get to the yahoo site, it is definitely DNS related...

To get around this, go to your TCP properties window and hardcode your DNS server addresses into the stack.  This way, you can use your statically assigned IP address, and the DNS servers that your ISP provides for you..  (Or your Domain Server)

FE
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PeggyPitchfordAuthor Commented:
Jeff and FE,

Thanks for the suggestions and input.  I did as you suggested and it worked!  The machine with DHCP did not have any DNS entries, although the DNS entries were stored in the modem/router.  The static IP'd machine had the hard-coded DNS entries.  I changed the DHCP machine to static IP, disabled DHCP server, and everything seemed to work great.

Thanks for the info.  

Peggy
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Fatal_ExceptionCommented:
Very good..!!  
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