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T1 between offices?

Posted on 2004-10-12
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Last Modified: 2010-04-11
I'm a newbie when it comes to business solutions, so bear with me.  I was wondering I have a situation where I'd like to have the best cost-effective solution for a small-size business lets say it has one office in Toronto and the other in Ottawa.  Does the occasion transfer every now and then  Is it possible that they can have a dedicated T1? ( or if there is something cheaper and better? ) I need something that will always be up.  And at the same time can we have them use lets say DSL for their internet needs?

Thanks.
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Question by:kevin_ma
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PsiCop earned 400 total points
ID: 12294570
I dunno about prices up there in the Great White North, but dedicated circuits like T1s tend to be expensive elsewhere. They are generally a fairly expensive solution, altho it would work for what you want (don't forget to add in the relevant ISP charges too).

I'd suggest using DSL and then establishing a secure link between the two offices using a VPN. The inter-office traffic would go thru the tunnel and be protected, while Jane User in Ottowa browsing would simply pass out the firewall to eBay or Google or whatever.

Don't forget the firewall. A VPN-enabled firewall would allow you to kill two stones with one bird.

Anyway, I'd find someone selling "business-class" DSL in each city and get that - you mainly want the static IP addressing. You can do NAT on the inside of each network.
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by:cwisofsky
cwisofsky earned 50 total points
ID: 12294864
I recommend PSICOP's VPN over DSL solution as well.  A very good product line to checkout is the CISCO PIX 501 series.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/vpndevc/ps2030/ps2031/index.html

These firewall, routers are great inexpensive devices with strong security and VPN features.  They even have a GUI for configuring it now.  I recommend getting at least a 1 year service contract from Cisco until you have gained the experience to support their devices fully on your own.  It's great insurance for entering a new technical area.
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by:Wolfpup99
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I totally agree with PsiCop and cwisofsky.  Any type of dedicated circuit Toronto - Ottawa would be expensive, T1 expecially so.  The beauty of the Internet is that it provides an almost-free high-speed transport infrastructure, and VPN on top of that gives you a secure private network.  So the only consideration is what to service to use for the base Internet connectivity.

For a very small business the starting low-end option would be something like Business Internet High Speed from Bell Canada ($59.95/month with a 1-year contract, or $89.95 with a static IP address which would also let you run a server).  This service uses an upgraded version of the same basic technology that provides their ADSL home Internet service and provides up to 4 Mbps over a shared phone line.  Then there's Business Internet Dedicated which is a whole program for larger businesses (www.bell.ca).

Another option is the business version of the consumer cable modem which has similar pricing and speeds; in Toronto that would be from Rogers Cable (www.rogers.com).

My own personal bias is that Bell is a better bet for business telecom.

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by:Wolfpup99
ID: 12296455
A quick correction:  as PsiCop has already pointed out, you'll almost certainly need static IP's for the VPN to work :) :)  So you really only have the one low-end option from Bell Business Internet High-Speed, plus the higher-end Business Internet Dedicated programs, or the equivalent from the numerous 3rd party providers around but I don't know any to recommend.  My experience with the Bell low-end offering has been very positive in terms of reliability, somewhat less so in terms of raw speed.
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by:LL6
ID: 12337101
You don't really need a static ip  for vpn to work, as there are sites like no-ip.com which negates the need for a static ip, and hey a T1 connection is pretty heavy duty for what you have said, but god it would be nice, better yet why not T3, but still yeah I think a DSL connection would be fine as long as you get the right one that suits your business.
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