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DNS & DHCP

Posted on 2004-10-13
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A little confused about DNS & DHCP exactly was is the difference between each of them?
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Question by:dMBush
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blkline earned 200 total points
ID: 12302556
DNS is the Domain Name System.  It's what takes "somehost.somedomain.com" and returns an IP address.

DHCP is the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol.   It's used in a LAN and allows for the automatic configuration of a computer on the LAN.  The client basically "asks" for a DHCP server to provide to it an IP address, a list of DNS servers (so it can find IP addresses) and the routing information it needs to participate on the network.   (There's a ton of other things that you can do with DHCP, too)
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by:Luxana
ID: 12303765
Definition of DHCP:

(Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) – This is a protocol that lets network administrators centrally manage and automate the assignment of IP Addresses on the corporate network. When a company sets up its computer users with a connection to the Internet , an IP address must be assigned to each machine. Without DHCP , the IP address must be entered manually at each computer . DHCP lets a network administrator supervise and distribute IP addresses from a central point and automatically sends a new IP address when a computer is plugged into a different place in the network.DHCP uses the concept of a ‘lease’ or amount of time that a given IP address will be valid for a computer. Using very short leases, DHCP can dynamically reconfigure networks in which there are more computers than there are available IP addresses.

http://tldp.org/HOWTO/DHCP/index.html

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Definition of DNS:

(Domain Name Server) – Used to map names to IP addresses and vice versa. Domain Name Servers maintain central lists of domain name/IP addresses and map the domain names in your Internet requests to other servers on the Internet until the specified web site is found.

http://tldp.org/HOWTO/DNS-HOWTO.html
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