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Windows 2000 Won't Boot After Installing Latest Windows Critical Updates

Posted on 2004-10-14
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Last Modified: 2010-04-13
After Critical Updates were installed today (likely the past 8 updates with a couple of reboots between), the machine has lost it's hard drive boot record.  The machine had been working fine and had real time virus protection enabled with the latest updates so do not highly suspect a trojan boot virus (but its always possible).   It rarely uses email or gets on the Web other than for Windows updates.  

In booting from the Win2K CD and going to the Recovery Console + Emergency Repair; selecting and running just the boot disk check and fix routine, the program would not automatically fix it.  I do not have Emergency Recovery floppies for this machine but could create them on another.   I am ready to try some other recovery methods before attempting a reload but *not clear on the exact process of doing recovery* in this case.  I do not want to risk losing the data on this file sharing machine with an Access Database.  I do have a tape backup through last night but I never trust tape unless the last recovery resort (from past experience) and have new data entered in the database this morning.

Help!... need to get this back running quickly.

chuck53

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Question by:chuck53
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8 Comments
 
LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:nihlcat
ID: 12311852
OK, so what exactly does it do at this point when you boot it normally?  
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LVL 18

Accepted Solution

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luv2smile earned 800 total points
ID: 12311910
You can try creating a boot disk to see if you can boot into the machine.

From another machien copy the following files onto a disk and try booting:

Boot.ini
NTLDR
Ntdetect.com
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Author Comment

by:chuck53
ID: 12312132
nihlcat:
When booting normally it asks for a boot disk in A: (boot sequence in BIOS is C:, CD, & then A:).  System boots from Win2K CD or will boot from a floppy but not from the hard drive.  Recovery console can be used then and that's where I am currently sitting on the screen.
Chuck
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LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:nihlcat
ID: 12312234
It normally asks for a boot disk in A: ?  Mmmkay, you should try luv2smile's suggestion and let us know.  Can't hurt anything.  Also, you stated your hard drive boot record is lost, have you tried to run 'fixboot' from the recovery console (I didn't see a specific reference in you problem explanation) ?
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Author Comment

by:chuck53
ID: 12312551
Before the CD loads, the first message that very quickly flashes across the screen is something like "missing boot record"  before it starts loading from the CD.

Have not tried fixboot or fixmbr but did try the check and fix boot record via Emergency Recovery option (a different section of recovery options).  

As far as a valid recovery process to follow here:
Is Fixboot what to try first???  or nihlcat's suggestion first?  Does it matter?  I am not finding boot.ini file in the entire C: drive on either of two working Win2K machines I tried.  I did find the other two files.

Are there extensions after the fixboot fixmbr commands which need to be set or am I thinking about earlier O/S's with command level commands and switches?


Chuck
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LVL 6

Assisted Solution

by:nihlcat
nihlcat earned 1200 total points
ID: 12312645
Try luv2smile's suggestion first, it's less intrussive.  But take the CD out of the drive first, because of your server's boot order (A: is last).  You can't find a boot.ini anywhere?  Oh, that's right it's hidden.  You need to "show hidden files" when looking for the file.  Just in case you can't find it, copy below and save it as boot.ini:

[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT="Microsoft Windows 2000 Server" /fastdetect
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Author Comment

by:chuck53
ID: 12313488
Booting from nihlcat's floppy using the three files above fixed the problem.  First I heard the floppy being accessed then it went quiet and I had a black screen.  Power cycling the system then allowed Windows to boot from the hard drive and all seems well from what I can tell so far.  Look at the system in more detail on Friday (tomorrow).

1.  Is there anything else I need to do or check?  i.e. is a hard drive on a downward spiral?
2.  Can you tell me what these commands actually did and can these be used for similiar situations with the same O/S?

thx,
Chuck

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LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:nihlcat
ID: 12313742
Since it's booting now, I would be cautious.  You should make Emergency Repair Disks right away. Here's how:
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?kbid=231777

And if you have not done so before, run Windows Backup, and select "System State Only"  Here's how:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/q240363/

It doesn't take long to do these, and may spare you trouble later.  Since you installed 8 updates, it's hard to say which one did it, but I suspect one of them did.  However I DO NOT recommend backing any out unless the error logs force you to.

Congratulations! :)
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