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wan network

can i connect three diffrent network on my data server so that server can communicate to any network or transfer data to any ?
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it_expertrtm
Asked:
it_expertrtm
1 Solution
 
EricCommented:
if using something like windows 2000/2003 you can assign multiple IP addresses, one for each network segment.  this should allow viewing of all networks..
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napoleon41Commented:
The easiest way would be to just add 2 more network interfaces.  I'm assuming, then, that you would have the 3 interfaces connected to respective switches on a normal port (not an uplink/WAN port)

                                   [Windows 2003-------------------------- File Server]
                                    |                             |                               |
                                    |                             |                               |
                          ..........|.                      ......|......                     ....|........
                         [Switch 1]                    [Switch 2]                    [Switch 3]

Unless you were wanting to connect the networks together, you would not need routing on the server.

                                                       
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gjohnson99Commented:
You use vlans same thing as adding  2 more cards but with out the cards
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napoleon41Commented:
gjohnson99, if you meant VLANS, then you need to say that in your original post.  Then, you need to specify that you can only use VLANS if you have switches that support it.  Then, you need to give some basic setup instructions on how to make that happen.


it_expertrtm, yes, you could do that with Virtual LANs, but you will be sharing a 100MB pipline with 3 networks, and it will take a lot more configuration and hastle.  You would have better thoughput (performance) with 3 individual interfaces, and, for as cheap as a NIC is, I'm not sure why you would go through all of the configuration.  Up to you, though.
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cooleditCommented:
hi, there

If they are manageable switches capable of VLAN and there is a router on the network go for the VLAN for future scalability
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gjohnson99Commented:
Most new newer hardware (less than 3 years old supports Vlans)

Any Managed swith should support Vlan.

And if  need more than 100 md  you should go with gig ethernet any way.

Configuration will look like this.

                                                         [ File Server]
                                                              lan card
                                                 [ vlan 1    vlan 2    vlan 3]
                                                                   |
                                         port  on Switch[ vlan 1    vlan 2    vlan 3]
                                                                Switch
        port  on Switch[ vlan 1]      port  on Switch[ vlan 2]      port  on Switch[ vlan 3]
                    |                                      |                                     |
                lan 1                                   lan 2                               lan3  
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PennGwynCommented:
You could install three network cards in the server, or one multi-port card.  

Instead of three networks, you could have three separate address ranges on a single network.  This is sometimes the easiest way to address legacy issues -- it's not really recommended that you build a new network this way.

If your switches and server support 802.1q trunking, you can implement all three networks as VLANs on a switch and connect an 802.1q trunk between that switch and the server.  This looks logically like the solution with three NICs, but two of them are virtual tunnels over the single physical connection.  (If you have a gigabit port on a switch, and can get a gigabit NIC for the server, this can be a good option.  You probably want to connect the switches together this way, too.)

Any of these three options would allow the server to communicate with any machine on any of the three networks.  If you want machines on one network to be able to connect to machines on another, you need to install RRAS and enable routing.

You might not want to dump that load on your server.  So a better alternative might be to dedicate some other box -- perhaps even one sold as a "router" -- to sit at the meeting point of the three networks and pass traffic between them.
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