Datarow lock in Oracle

Hello,
I would like to create a table with datarows as the default lock, how am I about to do it?
To be more specific, in Sybase I know something like the following

create table myTable (xxxxx) lock datarows
# as I understand, this sql statement will create a table with datarows locking is the chosen locking protocol.

The question is: can I have something similar to that in Oracle? What is the SQL statement?
Thanks,
Do
dttaiAsked:
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seazodiacConnect With a Mentor Commented:
dttai:

THere is no such thing in oracle, to your amazement, this is what Oracle is heads and shoulders above other RDBMS including sybase.

the default locking is the row-level locking in oracle.

but there are RS, RSX and X (exclusive) locking on the row level.
and there are the same on the table level.

but Oracle usually take care of this for you during your transaction, yes, transparent to users and developers.

all you need to do is read the manual and understand how oracle does this differently from other dbs.
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sapnamCommented:
As far as I know, there is no need to specify anything while creating the table.  Locking concepts change from database to database.  In Oracle, the locking is done by Oracle as needed.  In case you want to specifically lock a record, you can do that by using SELECT FOR UPDATE statements
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Mark GeerlingsDatabase AdministratorCommented:
Do not assume that Oracle does things the same way that SQL Server does.  In addition to the differences with record-locking (which Oracle does much better than SQL Server), some other things that are significantly different between SQL Server and Oracle are:
1. how nulls are handled and/or referenced
2. how dates are handled (Oracle dates can include the time)
3. "autonumber" columns - Oracle does not support them directly, but uses a sequence plus a trigger
4. whether stored procedures return result sets (arrays) or not

I wouldn't say that either the SQL Server way or the Oracle way is "better" or "worse"  for any of these, but be aware that they are different between the two systems, and if you are used to the way they work in SQL Server, you will have to learn some new ways of working with them in Oracle.
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