SCSI ID and removing old drive

Posted on 2004-10-17
Medium Priority
Last Modified: 2010-05-18
I have bad blocks in event viewer on a drive, so I am going to replace that drive.  The drives in the box are IBM something.  I unplug the last disc on the SCSI cable and the NT box does not boot.  During the boot process i can tell it is a AHA-2920 SCSI card.  I can also see that when the old drive is plugged in there is SCSI ID 0 - DISK0, SCSI ID 1- DISK1, SCSI ID 2-DISK2, SCSI ID 3 - DISK3, SCSI ID4 - DISK4.  The NT box has a software RAID5 stripe set with parity.
The first disk, disk 0, has (1GB) c: and the winnt direcotry.  The rest of disk 0, 16374 MB, and disk 1,2,3,4 (16374 MB) are in the stripe set with parity (drive d:).
On disk 4 there is an extra 1024MB left over being used for drive G: (which is a primary partition, not sure if that makes a difference or not).  

when I plug in the new drive, which is not the exact same drive, the new drive is a Seagate Cheetah, ST-318404LW.
I notice the ID's are different.
with the new drive, it starts with SCSI ID 1 - disk0.
and the new drive will be SCSI ID 8, but it is seen, however the NT box does not boot.
as much as i can tell I might have a jumper or pin differnet with the new drive, maybe with the SE (single ended bus) or something, i am not sure, which is why I am posting.
for a couple pictures on what my disk administrator looks like on the NT box, or a pic on which jumper I used go to
yes I do have a recent full backup of htis box, differentials since the full, however it is 60 GB of compressed images, and differentials since then.  It would be better if I can fix this than just redo the drives and restore from backup.

Thank you in advance for any assistance.  If you have any questions, please post.
Question by:plannett
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Expert Comment

ID: 12333646
Since you're using SCSI drives, I assume you've set the jumpers for single ended termination.  You can use the SCSI BIOS to select which drive to boot from, but depending on the ID in the chain, you may need to edit your boot.ini as well.

Author Comment

ID: 12334318
the jumper for the new drive would be the default.  I do not know what the drives in the server are set at, but there are 5 drives total.  I think I saw in the SCSI BIOS it was set to automatic if that helps.
The boot.ini should not need to be edited since this is not a boot drive.  I want the new drive to replace the old drive.  How do I get the new drive to be SCSI ID 4?

Accepted Solution

rwweyers earned 2000 total points
ID: 12334980
Cover only the third set of pins on the drive front side which is the side without the power connection that would be the third set from the right....  Was this a Raid drive....?
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Author Comment

ID: 12392970
yes, when I put it on the third set of pins it was not detected.  How do I make sure this drive is set for single ended termination? What is the difference between single ended termination and LVD?
OR where can I find more info on termination.


Expert Comment

ID: 12394934
What drive do you have exactly ( exact model and I need the drive configs from the other drives.

Author Comment

ID: 12395766
the top post has the model and it's link on the seagate website for the new drive.
I'll check on the old drives. I won't have the actual jumper configs until Monday.

Author Comment

ID: 12406064
It turns out I had the SCSI ID wrong.  I counted from the card starting with 0 and apparently 0 was at the end.  Which is why it didn't boot after I removed the cable because that was also disk 0.  After that the disks were in no certain order.  I had to unplug one bootup and find out which SCSI ID it was.  I finally found 4, replaced it, and the stripe set with parity is regenerating.


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