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Date Parsing

Hi,

I think java's date parsing is a little messed up...
Can someone explain why I get a true result in the following code snippet.
Thanks.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

import java.util.*;
import java.text.*;

public class Uptime
{
  public static void main(String []args) throws Exception
  {
   
          String started =       "28 Feb 2004 1:23:45 pm";
          String now =       "28 Feb 2004 1:23:45 am";
   
      SimpleDateFormat df=new SimpleDateFormat("dd MMM yyyy HH:mm:ss aa");

          Date s=df.parse(started,new ParsePosition(0));
          Date n=df.parse(now,new ParsePosition(0));
      System.out.println(s.equals(n)); // prints true...
  }

}
0
BabyFace
Asked:
BabyFace
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1 Solution
 
CEHJCommented:
Probably because you're telling Java you're using double digits for hours yet you're not in reality. If you move the String format to single figures, it will probably then take into account am/pm and print false
0
 
Tommy BraasCommented:
Hi BabyFace,

You're specifying to read the time as 24 hour clock, but have added the am/pm field, plus the actual time is in am/pm.

Try the following format:
"dd MMM yyyy h:mm:ss a")


\t
0
 
CEHJCommented:
o can you tell me how that answer (posted almost twenty minutes later) is any different from what i've said?
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Tommy BraasCommented:
CEHJ,
> o can you tell me how that answer (posted almost twenty minutes later)
> is any different from what i've said?
Certainly, you didn't mention that the actual parse string was in 24 hour format. You're not mentioning the conflict between the 24 hour clock and the am/pm field.

\t
0
 
CEHJCommented:
>>you didn't mention that the actual parse string was in 24 hour format

>>
you're using double digits for hours yet you're not in reality. If you move the String format to single figures, it will probably then take into account am/pm and print false
>>
0
 
CEHJCommented:
!?
0
 
Tommy BraasCommented:
CEHJ,

So are you saying the 10, 11, 12 are only legal values for the hour field in 24 hour notation?

\t

(being facetious...)
0
 
Tommy BraasCommented:
BabyFace,

Thank you much! =-)
0
 
CEHJCommented:
>>So are you saying the ..

I don't understand your comment, but i do understand that you've simply paraphrased the answer i gave:

>>You're specifying to read the time as 24 hour clock
==
>>you're using double digits for hours

and
>>
Try the following format:
"dd MMM yyyy h:mm:ss a")
>>
==
>> If you move the String format to single figures
0
 
Tommy BraasCommented:
CEHJ,
> >>You're specifying to read the time as 24 hour clock
> ==
> >>you're using double digits for hours

NOT the same thing. "HH" parses as 24 hour clock (which is what the asker was using), "hh" or "h" denotes 12 hour clock. Whether you use one or two 'h' is of NO consequence, same thing goes for the 'a'

\t
0
 
CEHJCommented:
>>NOT the same thing.

That's certainly what i meant by it
0
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