Question re: iterators...ASAP...please...

Do I need to use iterators when comparing strings within vectors?
I need to compare strings from one vector to strings in another vector.  The size of the vectors are different.
jeweeAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
pankajtiwaryConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Hi jewee,

Do not confuse. Iterators are objects to iterate through the elements of a container ( e.g vector ), if you want to iterate through a vector and so *something* you need iterators. Do check this example out.

// Code not tested
#include <iostream>

using namespace std ;

int main() {
    vector v1<string>(2);
    vector v2<string>(4);

    v1.push_back("abc");
    v1.push_back("def");

    v2.push_back("ghi");
    v2.push_back("jkl");
    v2.push_back("abc");
    v2.push_back("def");

    for ( vector<string>::const_iterator it1 = v1.begin(); it1 != v1.end(); it1++) {
        for ( vector<string>::const_iterator it2 = v2.begin(); it2 != v2.end(); it2++) {
            if ( *it1 == *it2 )
                doSomething();
        }
    }
    return 0 ;
}

Hope this helps.

Cheers!
0
 
jkrConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Ooops, haven't seen that you opened a seperate Q - here's the code again I posted in the last one:

string str = "substring";
vector<string> vs;

for ( vector<string>::iterator i = vs.begin(); i != vs.end(); ++i) {

    if ( -1 != i->find(str)) {

        cout << "Found " << str->c_str() " in in " i->c_str() << endl;
    }
}

If you want to find the exact match, use

if ( *i == str )

like pankajtiwary already suggested.
0
 
gugarioConnect With a Mentor Commented:
There's two ways you can access elements in a vector... one is using the bracket operator, so if you have...

vector<string> a;
vector<string> b;

you could do

if (a[0] == b[1]) cout << "equal";

another is dereferencing an iterator.. so you could have iteractors to the vectors, like

vector<string>::iterator t1 = a.begin();
vector<string>::iterator t2 = b.begin();

if (*t1 == *t2) cout << "equal";

bracket operators, in my opinion, are easier to use.  and part of the reason you would use a vector is so that you could do the direct access with the brackets..

iterators are good i guess if you need to iterate through both vectors completely... but you could still do it with for loops.

hope that helps.

Gustavo
0
 
jhshuklaCommented:
if you like to use bracket operators like Gustavo, vect.size() is the upper bound.
0
 
rstaveleyConnect With a Mentor Commented:
There are a lot of nice algorithms you can use that do the iterator work for you.

e.g.
--------8<--------
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>

typedef std::vector<std::string> StringVector;

class match {
      const std::string &name;
      const StringVector& cmp;
public:      
      match(const StringVector& cmp,const std::string& name) : cmp(cmp),name(name) {}
      void operator()(const std::string& str) const
      {
            bool found = find(cmp.begin(),cmp.end(),str) != cmp.end();
            std::cout << str << (found?" found ":" not found ") << "in " << name << '\n';
      }
};

int main()
{

      StringVector v1;
      v1.push_back("abc");
      v1.push_back("def");

      StringVector v2;
      v2.push_back("ghi");
      v2.push_back("jkl");
      v2.push_back("abc");
      v2.push_back("def");

      for_each(v2.begin(),v2.end(),match(v1,"v1"));
}
--------8<--------
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.