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Dual Boot, one pc, the same OS W2k

Hi!

We need to install W2K on the same pc, different partitions.  The dual-boot would be the same OS (windows 2000 pro).  One partition will be on a workgroup, and the other will be on domain.  First, is this possible?  If so, are there any known problems that may occur with regards to registry corruption, networking, and/or hardware conflicts?

Thanks in advance....
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emacyam
Asked:
emacyam
2 Solutions
 
PCTrubbleShooterCommented:
No, this works great. No registry or hardware problems would result. I would suggest using different IP addresses for each separate boot, simply to ease the confusion the other networked PCs may encounter.
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bacvainCommented:
Read this and you'll get an idea of what dual-boot implecates.

Dual Applications for Dual Boot :
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Running a dual-boot system has one more catch: Each OS is on a separate partition and operates unaware of the other, so you need to install applications that you want to use on both OSs twice. Applications can share data and, in most cases, directory structures. Unfortunately, some applications install different executable files for each OS, in which case you have to create separate directory structures. You can't predict which applications will install different executable files, so you need to rely on experience to learn which applications behave this way.

You might also have trouble uninstalling an application that the OSs share. The OS from which you first run the uninstall process will delete the executable files and libraries and will remove entries for the application from the OS's Registry database, but the OS won't touch the other OS's Registry. When you dual-boot to the other OS, the uninstall process might fail because the executable file is missing. Then, you need to reinstall the application before you can uninstall it.

My approach is to install only the applications that I need on each OS.
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KaliKoderCommented:
Hello emacyam,

Yes you can do what you want to do without any problems and it is definitely possible. However, the following is what I would consider before you upgrade

- Although what you have asked has been many times before, still you need to make sure you take a backup of all your data before you go ahead with the upgrade
- Make sure you do a "clean" install on the secondary partition, wipe it clean and then install it on there
- One very important consideration is to make it install on NTFS or a FAT32 parition. If your current OS is installed on FAT32 instead of NTFS and the second copy you want to install would be NTFS, you would not be able to access that drive when you are booted into the FAT32 partition, so keep that in mind (vice versa, the FAT32 and NTFS access)
- Once you do a clean install, you would obviously have to reinstall all the programs etc you want on to the new partition, cuz you cant just click an executable file from the other partition and expect it to work
- Regarding, having a different IP address for your secondary boot, I believe it is unnecessary. What you should really do, is give the computer a different "NAME" which is more descriptive, that keeps it much more distinguishable. If you are using a DHCP addressing scheme on your network, I would recommend you stick with keep the ip address as DHCP rather than giving it a different (static) ip address. DHCP is self configurable, and if you are on an Active Directory domain, it would self register with the DNS, have the correct entries for DNS, gateway etc (much less room for error).

In a nut shell... gooooo Nutsssss!!! :) you be ok!!

Thanks and Good Luck ! :)
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