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Basic traffice forwarding on 1710 router

Posted on 2004-10-20
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Last Modified: 2013-11-30
int e0 set to 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0

int fa0 set to 209.40.171.195 255.255.255.224  (ISP Supplied) Also, the ISP said my gateway is 209.40.171.193

I have created an access list:
     access-list 100 permit tcp any any

I assigned this access-list to int e0
     ip access-group 100 out

I still can not ping any "outside" web sites from the router....what is wrong?  What am I supposed to do with the 209.40.171.193 address?
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Question by:MCHDMISDEPT
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by:JFrederick29
JFrederick29 earned 1000 total points
ID: 12360415
I don't think you want only TCP traffic to be allowed out do you?  If you want to allow all traffic, the access-list should be "access-list 100 permit ip any any"  but if you are going to use that access-list, you might as well not even use one.  Get rid of the access-list all together.

The gateway needs to be used in your default route statement:

ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 209.40.171.193

Do you have NAT setup on the router?

int e0
ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
ip nat inside

int fa0
ip address 209.40.171.195 255.255.255.224
ip nat outside

ip nat inside source list 1 interface fa0 overload

access-list 1 permit 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255
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by:MCHDMISDEPT
ID: 12360455
question:  Do you have to use NAT any time you setup a router...i mean what happens if you dont use the NAT statement
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by:JFrederick29
ID: 12360485
You need to use NAT when you are connecting to the Internet and using a private address space on the internal network.

You are using 192.168.1.0 which is a private subnet (not routable on the Internet).

209.40.171.195 is a public address (routable on the Internet).  NAT allows you to connect privately addressed systems to the Internet using the public IP address from your ISP.  Basically, NAT translates the 192.168.1.x address to 209.40.171.195.

You need to use NAT in your situation.
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lrmoore earned 1000 total points
ID: 12360493
   > access-list 100 permit tcp any any
>I assigned this access-list to int e0
     ip access-group 100 out

>I still can not ping any "outside" web sites from the router....what is wrong?
Because you did not permit ICMP or UDP (for DNS resolution), only TCP in your acl

Agree with JFrederick29, simply remove the access-group from the interface. you have it applied in the wrong direction anyway.. should be "in" instead of "out", but like JF said, it's not needed at all if you want to permit everything anyway..


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by:MCHDMISDEPT
ID: 12360505
Great!  Finally someone answered my simple question.  Thanks.
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by:AutoSponge
ID: 12360585
There is an implicit deny at the end of all ACLs and they process line-by-line in order.
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by:JFrederick29
ID: 12360593
Keep in mind, you may be permitting all the necessary traffic but if you don't have NAT properly configured, you will never be able to ping/access an Internet host from a system on your internal network.
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by:lrmoore
ID: 12403465
Any progress? Are you still working on this? Do you need more information?
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