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NTDS.DIt

Posted on 2004-10-21
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Last Modified: 2010-05-18
Just curious, could you tell me why, the ntds.dit file is larger on a child domain than on main DC,  what extra does it contain


i have seen this on every install i have done (thousands!  in training enviroment)

ta
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Question by:mhamer
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6 Comments
 

Author Comment

by:mhamer
ID: 12368047
the smaller file size is alsothe gc hence my curiosity
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Expert Comment

by:farpost
ID: 12368103
ntds.dit is an AD database file, so you can expect it be the same on all domain controllers. But domain controllers do not replicate database file, they replicate data contained in the database. And, over time, the database files become fragmented, and can be defragmented only manually.

Here is a good article about manual defragmentation:
http://www.winnetmag.com/Article/ArticleID/13400/13400.html
      
       

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Author Comment

by:mhamer
ID: 12368382
sorry i phrasedit wrong, i know what it is, I was wondering why on child domain servers it is larger than on the parent  even on new builds, the parent is als a gc so you would have thought it would be larger not smaller.

why is this  (new install not fragmented yet)
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Expert Comment

by:farpost
ID: 12376276
What OSes are you use on your DCs?

I checked couple of domains:
1)
first DC win2000, gc, ntds.dit - 45072 Kb
second DC, win2003, ntds.di - 34023 Kb

2) first DC, win2003, gc, ndts.dit - 75065 Kb
2) second DC, win2003, ntds.dit - 59982 Kb

So on both I have ntds.dit smaller on the child DC.
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Accepted Solution

by:
Netman66 earned 500 total points
ID: 12377882
This is normal.

The child domain has most of the contents of the root plus, in the Domain container it has root info and it's own domain info - thus it's larger.

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Author Comment

by:mhamer
ID: 12378622
thanks


2003 on all servers, I work in a training company so get to setup literally hundreds of servers and domians, the child is always larger that i have seen, theses are not production machines and only used for a few days so they could well change after some use.
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