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Monitor short-circuit 3 times in a row

Posted on 2004-10-22
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Last Modified: 2010-04-25
I sold a computer with 17" monitor some time ago. After a few months I got a call that the monitor was now giving a vague image so I swappad it for another 2nd hand monitor, which gave up next day (after some knispering and banging inside, sounded loike a short-circuit) so I swapped it again, all free of charge:( by the way.

However I just got a call.....this monitor also collapsed. Since the last one was the monitor I had owned myself for two years, completely to my satisfaction, I start to wonder if something might be wrong: with the computer instead with the monitors? How can  determine what's wrong there? By the way I'm not an electrician.
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Question by:ruud00000
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6 Comments
 
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Callandor earned 1400 total points
ID: 12383935
It is most likely the electrical outlet that the monitor is plugged into for power.  If the eiring in the building was not done properly or had extensive modifications done to it that exceeded the design, there could be power fluctuations and surges that will damage a monitor.  The fix is to correct the wiring situation or get a UPS and connect it to that.  A video card has signal level voltages (around 1 volt) which would not damage a monitor.
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by:Callandor
ID: 12383943
oops: eiring => wiring
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by:amann44
amann44 earned 80 total points
ID: 12384443
A UPS will balance the power load much better. Also, have the user switch outlets or residences for that matter.
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LVL 32

Assisted Solution

by:_
_ earned 520 total points
ID: 12387035
To add to what Callandor said:
there might be something running on the same circuit that the monitor is on, that is causing the fluctuations and/or surges.
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Author Comment

by:ruud00000
ID: 12387586
Ok thanks I got an idea where to look now.
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by:_
ID: 12391528
Thank you much.    : )
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