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Accessing Unix home directory from Windows?

Posted on 2004-10-23
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Last Modified: 2013-12-23
I need a way to access my unix home directory from Windows (2000/XP) so that it is visible as a local drive.
Is there any way to use SMB or NFS (with some Windows NFS client) protocols to achive that, without unix server root privilages?

I will be happy with ANY solution for this problem that:
- does NOT require root privilages on unix end
- does NOT require to spend any money

Thanks,
x-pander
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Question by:x-pander
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11 Comments
 
LVL 62

Assisted Solution

by:gheist
gheist earned 400 total points
ID: 12390010
http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/features/2001/oct01/10-22winxpmobility.asp

you paid for it so "where do you want to go today?"

microsoft gives services for unix for free, www.microsoft.com/unix or so , but either server on unix will require root privileges and assistance from system administrator.
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LVL 38

Accepted Solution

by:
wesly_chen earned 600 total points
ID: 12391786
Hi,
  Go download the Windows service for UNIX 3.5 (SFU) from the following website.
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/sfu/  (more than 100MB)

   It's free..... Basically, its NFS client part is for your purpose.
However, you need to ask your Unix system administrator ... (may be not)
Do "df -k ." on your unix home directory, then you will know where your home directory actually located.
<hostname>:/<path>
Then you need to map your GID and UID in SFU to be able to mount your home directory on PC.

The worse case is your home directory is on one Unix machine and doen't export to NFS. Then you need your system admin's assistence..... /_\

Good luck,

Wesly
0
 
LVL 62

Expert Comment

by:gheist
ID: 12391862
or you can use any ftp client , like thunderbird or wsftp fpr some access to your files
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LVL 1

Author Comment

by:x-pander
ID: 12392905
yea, sfu seems to be the way to go
my home dir is at /usr/home1/xxxxxx on a local disk of unix server
but how do i check if my homedir is exported to NFS?

ordinary ftp client is no good as i need to mount my homedir as a drive letter
I've used WebDrive and it work perfectly... until the trial period has ended
and now i urgently need some costless solution

0
 
LVL 62

Expert Comment

by:gheist
ID: 12393182
1) rpcinfo -p should show that mountd and nfsd is running
2) showmount then shows what is exported

if not please post output of uname -a from UNIX system to get hints how to determine/setup nfs
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:x-pander
ID: 12394206
this is HP-UX
i will check if this is a workable solution for me tomorrow (as i dont have an acces to unix system today)

thanx,
x-pander
0
 
LVL 62

Expert Comment

by:gheist
ID: 12394617
showmount -a

0
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:chris_calabrese
ID: 12402336
The admins might also support samba, which would allow you to mount your home directory without loading any special softaware on your PC. The first step is to ask the unix admins what they recommend.
0
 
LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:wesly_chen
ID: 12403177
Hi,

> my home dir is at /usr/home1/xxxxxx on a local disk of unix server
When you login to other unix box (not the workstation where your home directory is at)
and do "df -k ~". If the output look like
<hostname of home directory>:/xxx/xxxx  <number>  <number>  <number>  <percentage>  /usr/home1/xxxx
Then the NFS daemon is running on the unix server where your home directory is at.

Besides, type "id" to get your gid and uid.

Regards,

Wesly
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:x-pander
ID: 12404958
samba is not supported on unix box
my home directory is also not being nfs exported i think (showmount shows nothing)
i think i will have to persuade admin to make it so :)
are security risks of nfs exporting my homedir any greater then making it accesible via ftp (which is already true)?
0
 
LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:wesly_chen
ID: 12406222
nfs exporting vs ftp?

If all are inside the firewall, it should be ok. But it depends on your company policy.
You can ask your admin to export only your home directory and you take the risk (others' are not exported).
Then you can use SFU to mount it.

Good luck,

Wesly
0

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