Best certification to get

What is the end-all-be-all certification in Networking? Mostly for windows, but I want to get one for Linux too.
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DrDamnitAsked:
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NetworkArchitekCommented:
Hi DrDamnit,
The end-all-be-all is considered CCIE and CISSP. It breaks down like this though
Linux > RHCE - Red Hate Cert Engineer

MS > MCSE - Microsoft Certified Engineer

Cisco > CCIE - Cisco Cert I-net Eng.

Security > CISSP - Certified Information Systems Security Professional

The CCIE and the RHCE both include lab components and are considered tops in the fields, though the CCIE may carry more weight. The CISSP is somewhat daunting as it has an "experience" requirement, like 3 years in the industry or some such like that. Hope this helps.

Cheers!
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JammyPakCommented:
Actually, for Linux, RedHat came out with the RHCA (for 'Architect')...it's now the top certification they offer
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NetworkArchitekCommented:
RHCA, now that's just going to far. =)
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DrDamnitAuthor Commented:
Network Architek,

Whats the cost of those?
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JammyPakCommented:
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dramatix01Commented:
FYI - The CISSP has a 4-year experience-in-the-field requriement if you have no education.  If you hold a bachelor's degree in computer science then that requirement drops to 3 years.  If you hold a master's degree then the requriement drops to 2 years.
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NetworkArchitekCommented:
DrDamnit,
MCSE is 7tests x 125 a pop. But there are vouchers you can find for a little discount. RHCE is about $650. The CCIE comes out to about $1100, I believe, which includes the written test and the lab. But with the CCIE you must have the CCNP and the CCNA (or taken the course) which are combined $375 or so. The CISSP is near the $1000 mark, I think, not sure  about that one but it is some what costly.
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Felix2000Commented:
You don't require CCNA/CCNP to write the CCIE... but you essentially need the knowledge of that for CCIE.
I believe CCIE would be the toughest to obtain because you need to write a Written exam and do a Practical Exam (and there are only a few test centers for the practical)  You also need experience.

CISSP is probably the next hardest as you need the experience because they do background checks.  You are also require a current CISSP to sponser you.

-= Felix =-
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epylkoCommented:
As a CCIE, I can tell you the lab test used to be 2 days and $1000. It is now one day and costs $1250. You also have to pass a written test to be able to take the lab. The written test (as well as a written CCIE recertification exam every two years) costs $300 per test.

-Eric
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