Want to win a PS4? Go Premium and enter to win our High-Tech Treats giveaway. Enter to Win

x
?
Solved

VLAN Question

Posted on 2004-10-25
23
Medium Priority
?
314 Views
Last Modified: 2010-03-17
Please Correct My Statements.

IN A Network With Two Different Vlans
A,C in a Same Collission Domain.
B,D in a Same Collission Domain.
A,B in The  Vlan 1 ,C,D in the Vlan  2
"A" Host send an address Resoulation Protocol Frame with Host B s IP adress
and Broadcast Mac address.
The layer 2 Siwtch 1(Enabled For Vlan Supporting) ADD Vlan ID Tag to it and progpagate
on Vlan Trunks,Every Switchs on Vlan Trunk that Enabled For That Vlan ID Forward This Frame.
Frame P Was BRoadcasted on Vlan  1 For Reciveing Mac Response.
After Recieving Mac Address  in valn 1.
Host A sends its packets with Mac Address of a Switch 1,
and swith1 send its packets with Mac adress Switch2 on Vlan Trunk
and Switch 2 Send recieved packets to Host B.


thanks in advance for your helps
Hamid Reza




 
0
Comment
Question by:123456
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 11
  • 8
  • 4
23 Comments
 
LVL 79

Assisted Solution

by:lrmoore
lrmoore earned 200 total points
ID: 12401434
You cannot have two devices in the same collision domain if they are in different VLAN's.
VLAN's define Broadcast domains. All devices within the same vlan are in the same broadcast domain.
Collision domains are entirely different. Each and every switchport is its own collision domain.
0
 
LVL 2

Author Comment

by:123456
ID: 12401905
>>VLAN's define Broadcast domains.
VLAN Segmented Broad cast domain.
0
 
LVL 2

Author Comment

by:123456
ID: 12401912
>>All devices within the same vlan are in the same broadcast domain.
ok
0
What does it mean to be "Always On"?

Is your cloud always on? With an Always On cloud you won't have to worry about downtime for maintenance or software application code updates, ensuring that your bottom line isn't affected.

 
LVL 2

Author Comment

by:123456
ID: 12401942
You cannot have two devices in the same collision domain if they are in different VLAN's.
PLease See Figure 5 From this link.
http://net2.ucadavis.edu/newvlan.htm
0
 
LVL 79

Expert Comment

by:lrmoore
ID: 12401973
I cannot access that link

0
 
LVL 2

Author Comment

by:123456
ID: 12401979
>>You cannot have two devices in the same collision domain if they are in different VLAN's.
You Suppose it is located on differented Vlan Based broadcast Domain.
0
 
LVL 2

Author Comment

by:123456
ID: 12401987
0
 
LVL 2

Author Comment

by:123456
ID: 12402017
0
 
LVL 79

Expert Comment

by:lrmoore
ID: 12402193
I think you are confusing broadcast domains with collision domains.

Given that the campus network is all switched, then each and every switch port is its own collision domain. It is physically impossible to have multiple devices on the same port/same collision domain.

Each VLAN defines a different broadcast domain. A broadcast packet from VLAN 5 will never be seen by hosts in VLAN 4.


0
 
LVL 4

Accepted Solution

by:
JonSh earned 200 total points
ID: 12405367
I'm gonna add a comment here which is probably unwelcome but should be added from the perspective of completeness.  It is completely possible to have two vlans in one collision domain.  It's just a silly idea, in almost all cases.  Consider the following:



                                                  -----------------------------------------------------------------
                                                  |           BIG Switch supporting VLANS                          |
                                                  -----------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 |                                             |
                                                                 | VLAN A                                  | VLAN B
                                                                 |                                             |
                                                  -----------------------------------------------------------------
                                                  |                 MULTIPORT REPEATER (HUB)                   |-------Sniffer
                                                  -----------------------------------------------------------------
                                                       |                 |                       |                    |
                                                       |                 |                       |                    |
                                                NIC-ON-A      NIC-ON-B          NIC-ON-C        Crosover
                                                                                                                 Connection
                                                                                                                 to yet another
                                                                                                                 switch providing
                                                                                                                  VLAN C

(Now I wait for the walls to come crashing down :))

Jon


0
 
LVL 79

Expert Comment

by:lrmoore
ID: 12405439
Nice illustration, Jon!
That's thinking outside the box!
0
 
LVL 2

Author Comment

by:123456
ID: 12424615

>>I think you are confusing broadcast domains with collision domains.
From That Article:
Virtual LANs (VLANs) can be viewed as a group of devices on different physical LAN segments which can
communicate with each other as if they were all on the same physical LAN segment.
Switches using VLANs create the same division of the network into separate broadcast domains but do not
have the latency problems of a router.

Broadcast Domain
The set of all devices that will receive broadcast frames originating from any device within the set. Broadcast
domains can be bounded by VLANs in a stand-alone environment. In an internetworking environment, they are
typically bounded by routers because routers do not forward broadcast frames.

Collision Domain
In Ethernet, the network area within which frames that have collided are propagated. Repeaters and hubs
propagate collisions; LAN switches, bridges and routers do not

>>Each VLAN defines a different broadcast domain. A broadcast packet from VLAN 5 will never be seen by hosts in VLAN 4.
it is right.


My purpose Is this Figure:

                                                     Router  
                                                /                    \                                              
                                              /                        \          
                                            /                            \    
                                           
                      Switch Layer 2      --------------------    Switch Layer 2    
                                                                                                   
                 /                      \                                    /                     \
                /                        \                                 /                         \
              /                            \                             /                             \
   ----------------             --------------------       ----------------             ------------
   NIC A(VLAN 1)            NIC C ( VLAN 2)            NIC B(VLAN 1)           NIC D( VLAN 2)    
                 

After Attention to My Upper Figure PLease Correct My stateMents in First Comment of my Question

0
 
LVL 79

Expert Comment

by:lrmoore
ID: 12424723
Then:
>A,C in a Same Collission Domain.
>B,D in a Same Collission Domain.
>A,B in The  Vlan 1 ,C,D in the Vlan  2

Would be:

  A,B in a Same broadcast Domain.
  C,D in a Same broadcast Domain.
   A,C cannot see each other at layer 2 - a broadcast from A will not reach C
   B,D cannot see each other at layer 2 - a broadcast from B will not reach D
  A,B in The  Vlan 1 ,C,D in the Vlan  2
  If A sends ARP broadast for B, yes, the vlan tagging is handled within the switches only

>Host A sends its packets with Mac Address of a Switch 1,
>and swith1 send its packets with Mac adress Switch2 on Vlan Trunk
>and Switch 2 Send recieved packets to Host B.

No. Once Host A learns MAC address of Host B, then Host A sends packets directly to Host B MAC. The switches' job is to keep track of which MAC address is associated on which physical port.

0
 
LVL 2

Author Comment

by:123456
ID: 12425441
>>No. Once Host A learns MAC address of Host B, then Host A sends packets directly to Host B MAC
I dont know How Learn Mac address of B and D?
Can You Explain me ?
0
 
LVL 2

Author Comment

by:123456
ID: 12425470
>>A,B in a Same broadcast Domain.
OK, but Dont you think these stations located on
Various Collission Domains.
0
 
LVL 79

Assisted Solution

by:lrmoore
lrmoore earned 200 total points
ID: 12425680
Host A will not learn MAC address of C or D - arp broadcasts are not propagated across VLAN's
Host A learns MAC address of B through ARP
Host A cannot communicate with C or D, unless there is a router somewhere to route between the VLAN's

YES, A and B are in the same broadcast domain, separate collision domains.
YES, C and D are in the same broadcast domain, separate collision domains.
A, B, C and D are all in separate collision domains.

0
 
LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:JonSh
ID: 12426959
Hamid, it might help you if I state the general rules for what you are asking:

Within the same VLAN (whether you traverse many switches or the same switch), ALL traffic is handled at layer 2 (switched).

Across differing VLANS (whether you traverse many switches or the same switch), ALL traffic is handled at layer 3 (routed).

Now, once you get this straight, throw it away because we also have layer 2 routing :)  And as far as your statements, lrmoore has corrected them beautifully.  It is important to note (as he said) that A, B, C, & D are all in separate collision domains.

0
 
LVL 79

Expert Comment

by:lrmoore
ID: 12436284
Does this all make sense to you yet?

0
 
LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:JonSh
ID: 12436363
I'm waiting for Hamid to include STP, at which point all the switches crash Vlan 0 :)

0
 
LVL 2

Author Comment

by:123456
ID: 12485828
Sorry For My Delay.
I was ill and i Forgotten this Question.
>>A, B, C and D are all in separate collision domains.
Can you Explain it bit more?
IS A,C  on a different collision domains?
0
 
LVL 4

Assisted Solution

by:JonSh
JonSh earned 200 total points
ID: 12486266
each port on a switch is it's own collision domain.  It isn't like a hub, in which everything is a shared colission domain.  On a switch, every connected device shares a collision domain with the switchport it is connected to.  This is one of the reasons a switch can provide more bandwidth, because each of it's ports is unshared with any other.

Yes, A,C are on different collision domains.


0
 
LVL 79

Expert Comment

by:lrmoore
ID: 12493178
>>>A, B, C and D are all in separate collision domains.
>Can you Explain it bit more?

As we have explained numerous times above, each and every physical port on a switch is an independent collision domain. Therefore, each and every host that is connected directly to this switch is in its own collision domain. No two hosts will ever be in the same collision domain.
Ergo:
  > IS A,C  on a different collision domains?
YES - A, B, C and D are all in different collision domains..

0
 
LVL 2

Author Comment

by:123456
ID: 12493428
thanks for your good assistance.
0

Featured Post

NFR key for Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365

Veeam is happy to provide a free NFR license (for 1 year, up to 10 users). This license allows for the non‑production use of Veeam Backup for Microsoft Office 365 in your home lab without any feature limitations.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

    Over the past few years, small business and home owners have become so dependent on internet that a need for redundancy has arisen.    What happens when your small business or home / home office loses its internet connection?  The results c…
Why do some people recommend buying business VoIP from an ISP? What are the benefits to my company? What are the costs?
In this video, Percona Director of Solution Engineering Jon Tobin discusses the function and features of Percona Server for MongoDB. How Percona can help Percona can help you determine if Percona Server for MongoDB is the right solution for …
We’ve all felt that sense of false security before—locking down external access to a database or component and feeling like we’ve done all we need to do to secure company data. But that feeling is fleeting. Attacks these days can happen in many w…

618 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question