Fading music (WMA) in a PowerPoint presentation

I am inserting a WMA file (a song) into a presentation as background music.  The file will play through numerous slides and I would like to fade it down at a specific slide so that I can start a new sound file (song) on the next slide.  Currently the music ends abruptly and sounds unprofessional.  Does anyone know if there is a way to accomplish this?
ljschwartzAsked:
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brd24gorCommented:
What you might want to do is look into some sound editors out there such as Sound Edit Pro.  Most sound editors and mixers will have a fade-out feature you can integrate into the file.  If you have a timed slide presentation, you can edit the WMA file to fade after a certain length of time and set the timer on your slide to the same length as the edited WMA file.

As for something in PowerPoint that will do it for you, I don't know of any feature that will do anything like that.
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londonlifeCommented:
I have been successfully able to create fade-outs with using a sound editing program then importing the file into PowerPoint.
One thing you have to be careful with is that a PowerPoint file will play back at various speeds (give or take seconds) depending on what computer your running the presentation on (RAM available, CPU speed).  Therefore it becomes very difficult to have precise animations to match up with your slide show.  For example, It would be almost  impossible to match up an animation with a section of a song.  Everytime the presentation is played, the results would be different.  Audio works best when it has a buffer at the end of at least 3 to 4 seconds.  The longer the audio track is, the more 'off sync' with the animation it becomes.
Hope that helps!
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