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how do i use this file .ko ?

Posted on 2004-10-27
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Last Modified: 2013-12-06
fedora core 2 i have

now i want to use the sourceforge ntfs but i cant without intstalling this
kernel-ntfs-2.6.5-1.358.i586.ko
I do have the kernel compiling tools installed i just dont know how to use them











rpm -ivh kernel-ntfs-2.6.5-1.358.i586.rpm
Preparing...                ########################################### [100%]
   1:kernel-ntfs            ########################################### [100%]
_______________________________________________________________________________

ERROR: Cannot load the NTFS kernel module.

RPM: kernel-2.6.5-1.358.i586.rpm

PLEASE: Report this error to rpm@flatcap.org
_______________________________________________________________________________

error: %post(kernel-ntfs-2.6.5-1.358) scriptlet failed, exit status 1

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Question by:aot2002
    7 Comments
     
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    Expert Comment

    by:wesly_chen
    Hi,

       Just checked sourceforge website as the following URL:
    http://www.rhil.net/kernelstuff/modules.html

       It says that it is VERY DANGEROUS to use read/write NTFS filesystem. Are you should you want to do it?
    Or just NTFS read-only? (It's built-in within the kernel).

    Wesly
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    LVL 38

    Expert Comment

    by:wesly_chen
    By the way, the URL tell you how to use *.ko file as folowing:
    -------------------
    # cd /download-directory
    # mkdir /lib/modules/version/kernel/fs/ntfs
    # cp modulename /lib/modules/version/kernel/fs/ntfs/ntfs.ko    (for 2.6 kernels)   <===
    # depmod -a
    ------------------

    Wesly
    0
     
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    Author Comment

    by:aot2002
    well i really would like to use ntfs write but for now how about getting readonly to work right
    0
     
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    Expert Comment

    by:wesly_chen
    mount -t ntfs <partition> <mount point>
    Use fdisk -l /dev/hda (or /dev/hdb) to see which partition is ntfs.

    Wesly
    0
     
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    Expert Comment

    by:bestondoa
    Hi,

    Wesly_Chen is right. Writing to NTFS from linux is very dangerous and can corrupt data.
    Its advised to mount NTFS as read-only.

    If you really want to write to a Windows partition, you could make a FAT/FAT32 partition on the Windows machine and then  mount it read/write on the Linux. Linux can read and write without problems to FAT partitions. This way this partitions would be accessible to Windows and Linux both as read/write.

    Hope this helps,

    Bes
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    Expert Comment

    by:goldwarlock
    I suggest you compile NTFS ReadOnly support into kernel - this way you will not need to load module every time.

    You may try to write to NTFS partition and it works as long as the filesize is not changed - but it's VERY dangerous in case some application will try to change the size of a file.

    You should use FAT32 partition to exchange data. Or any networking partition or just FTP files to other box.
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    Accepted Solution

    by:
    For read/write support under linux you should look at captive ntfs at http://www.jankratochvil.net/project/captive/
    It requires two files from an existing Windows XP install, either home or pro. Windows 2000 isn't supported last time I checked.

    It takes the approach that wine and more recently programs like linuxant and ndiswrapper have taken. It uses Microsoft tools to access the NTFS partition. Using that approach you can read and write to a Microsoft NTFS partition.
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