Multiple Network Connections to Router

I am setting up Windows Small Business Server 2003 for the first time.  The server has a network card (DLink DFE-580TX) with four network adapters.  For simplicity whilst setting up the OS I set three of these adapters to Disabled, to avoid the server being configured as a gateway.

That's all working fine.  However, is there any value (throughput, fault tolerance, ...) in now configuring the connection between the server and the router to use two or more of these adapters?  If so then how do I go about configuring it?

Thanks
johnalphaoneAsked:
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corneliupCommented:
DFE-580TX Trunking Software for Windows 2000, NT (19.7MB)
http://www.dlink.com.au/tech/drivers/files/adapters/dfe-580tx_serverarray.zip
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harleyjdCommented:
Not really, unless you have a gigabit pipe to the 'net.

Just leave it as-is unless you plan to implement ISA from SBS premium at some point...
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johnalphaoneAuthor Commented:
It's more the speed of the client connections that I am concerned about, rather than the internet connection.  In practice the server connects to a 16-port network switch which in turn connects to the router.  At present it will be serving 11 clients.
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harleyjdCommented:
I still don't think you're going to get anything useful out of it unless you're doing something huge...

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map000Commented:
if the network card support it, you can do it
I use HP Proliant servers with 2 net cards which can be configured in fail over or load balancing
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corneliupCommented:
This is from the specs of your NIC:
"4-Port Trunk
Each of the 4 ports on the adapter can establish an independent full-bandwidth segment with a switch. When all 4 ports are connected to the switch, an 800Mbps trunk (4 Fast Ethernet ports running at full duplex) is created enabling high-speed, simultaneous access by workstations. "

And this can be done via the driver.
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harleyjdCommented:
good move, cornieliup.

there ya go john - if it's easy and bullet proof, go for it.

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corneliupCommented:
No offence, but if he can use the full potential of this NIC why not?
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johnalphaoneAuthor Commented:
Just the job.  I'll try it and report back.
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johnalphaoneAuthor Commented:
Oh heck I've accepted the wrong answer - should've been the one above from corneliup.
Anyone know how I can get this changed?
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harleyjdCommented:
damn, I thought this was my last points for the year.

post here: http://www.experts-exchange.com/Community_Support/ and request reopen.

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