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WinXP: Delete restoration data and proceed to system boot menu

On my Dell Inspiron 2650 laptop, running Win XP Pro I keep getting the following error after bringing the PC out of hibernate mode:
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System restart has been paused:

Continue with system restart.
Delete restoration data and proceed to system boot menu.
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This is covered by the following MS KB article - http://support.microsoft.com/kb/q294427/ - which suggests that the hibernate file has been corrupted.

Selecting "Delete restoration data and proceed to system boot menu." works, and the PC does reboot, although my "hibernate" state is obviously lost.

My problem is that this happens on a fairly regular basis.

Does anyone know what causes the hibernate file to be corrupted, and what steps I could take to prevent this happening in the future?  The KB article is pretty unhelpful in this reguard.

Thanks

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mr_davidlaing
Asked:
mr_davidlaing
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1 Solution
 
LucFCommented:
Hi mr_davidlaing,

Microsoft has confirmed this error and will probably fix this problem in a future WinXP update.
For now you can set the power management features on your notebook to use standby mode but not hibernate.

Greetings,

LucF
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mr_davidlaingAuthor Commented:
Thanks LucF,

I've checked my power management features; and it is already set to use standby rather than hibernate (or rather, to never hibernate)

Trouble is; I typically shut my PC (forcing standby), and then reopen it the next morning.  In the interim; it seems to automatically switch to hibernate - presumably because the battery runs low?
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LucFCommented:
Check your bios, you might have set the power options there the wrong way.

LucF
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mr_davidlaingAuthor Commented:
Embarassingly, I seem to have determined the cause for my perpetually corrupt hibernate file - low disk space!

Note to anyone reading this thread - ensure that you have sufficient disk space to store the hibernate file - this will be at least the same if not larger than the RAM your system has.

If you don't have enough disk space to store the hibernate file; it will obviously be "corrupted".

LucF; your advise put me on the right track; so you get the points.  Thanks
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LucFCommented:
Dang! Yeah, that's something I didn't think of at all :o)

Great to hear you found the problem, I'll surely keep it in mind.

LucF
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