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2003 server setup guide 4 NewB

Posted on 2004-11-03
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New to this stuff.  

I am attempting to set up a new 2003 server.  Network is currently a small 30 system P2P network.  We are going to add a 2003 server as a domain controller.  After that is complete we are going to set up exchange server on the same box.  

Is an online guide available for the setup process I can refer to so I don't have to keep asking question after question?  Is such a guide available for Exchange as well?  I am looking for as many resources as possible before embarking on this project.  


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Question by:SCCHIS
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by:mikeleebrla
ID: 12484467
well it all depends on what you are going to do with the server and what access you want for exchange.  Do you have an existing domain name already registered?  do you have an existing email system.  how do you want your outside clients to connect to the exchange server? via the web? POP3? MAPI? IMAP?  THere is no such thing a guide that will tell you step by step how to set up YOUR envirnment since no two envirnments are the same.  There are many security issues to consider as well and we will need to know much more about your network setup to guide you on this issue.
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by:luv2smile
ID: 12484482
Also if you have some money to invest...I'd look at buying some of the Microsoft Press Books. Managing and Maintaing a Microsoft  Windows Server 2003 Environment is a good one to start with as well as the Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Amin pocket consultant.....they both contain a lot of the same info...the first one is geared toward people wanting certification, but it is useful even if you are not. THe pocket consultant has a lot of stuff in a smaller book. Both are good resources. There are exchange books as well from M. Press.
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by:luv2smile
ID: 12484494
If you are going with a domain setup, I recommend you first learn Active Directory....what it is, how it works, terms: OUs, GPOs, containers, etc...
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by:SCCHIS
ID: 12484678
(note: I am also new to experts exchange so I don't want to ask too many dumb questions, I have been thrust into the role in my organization after our previous I.S. person left the company and they decided they didn't want to seek a highly qualified person :-) .... I'm not sure how the point thing works either)

Our company has a domain name registered that we use for our website.  We had planned to use the same domain name for our email adress.  Initially I am mostly concerned with getting our new server up and running on our network, & making it a domain controller.  That is the organizations main concern right now, user authentication, giving network drives to users. So I will put off the exchange issues somewhat unless they affect anything during the initial server setup.  

To give you an idea of the hardware we use, we just purchased a Dell Poweredge 2600, with a RAID 1/RAID 5 setup.  For performance purposes, we had planned on setting up the exchange server on the RAID 5 array keeping it seperate from the operating system.  I am at the process of the initial server setup now.  When I examine the drive configurations I see a C: with a 12GB partition, a D: with a 126GB partition, and an E: with a 22GB partition.  I beleive the 12GB and 22GB are partitioned off the two 36GB HD's on the RAID 1 array.  The 126GB I beleive is partitioned off the 3 72GB HD's on the RAID 5 array.

So to the Server 2003 setup: The first option that pops up after the initial registration of the server is the Manager Your Server Roles menu.  I went ahead and added the role of file server to this machine, but not sure if it's exactly how I want it.  I would assume the next logical thing to do is the DOMAIN CONTROLLER setup, as we will not be using this as a print server, application server, terminal server, remote access/VPN server.  Other options are: Mail server, DNS Server, DHCP server, Streaming Media server, & WINS Server.  Being that our initial goal is simply to create a network domain and set up the workstations to log onto the network domain is setting up the DOMAIN CONTROLLER the next step in this process?  




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mikeleebrla earned 2000 total points
ID: 12484793
ok,, you will have to set up a DNS server as well (active directy will NOT run without it) .  I dont know how your clients get IP addresses now but you also want this server to be a DHCP server as well.  You will want to have the DHCP and DNS both active directory integrated so they will sync up and everything will "know" whats going on.  i would simply run DCPROMO and set up the DC, it will see that you do not have DNS and will ask you if you want to set it up, chooose yes.  then you simply need to create your user accounts... then add your computers to the domain. and then you are set up as far as the DC goes...

as far as exchange you will have to call your ISP and have them add some additional DNS records for you public domain (this is 100% seperate from your local domain and your DNS server we just created) assuming you dont host your own dns.... you will have to tell them to create MX and SPF records that point to the external ip address of your server. You will also need to create an A record so users can get to your server.. this is generally something like mail.yourdomain.com.

on your firewall you will have to open whichever ports you want to access your email server though in addition to the mail port 25 so incomming mail can get through your firewall.

hope this helps, i know its not 100% complete but there are literally 1000s of options out there.
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by:SCCHIS
ID: 12484878
Thanks, I think at least I'm on the right track.  Right now all IP address are assigned manually.  I would prefer to keep everyone on the network with the same internal IP address.  Should I still set up server as DCHP, or is manually assigning the IP's an ok option?
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by:mikeleebrla
ID: 12484997
you can keep it like it is now,,, but its just easier if you use DHCP and DNS with active directory,, that way whenever computer "john" starts up,, it gets it DHCP address from the server and DNS "knows" about it as well.. so if you are trying to access a resource on "john" you will be able to since AD, DHCP, and DNS all know about "john" and you will be directed to his comptuer seemlessly
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