superscope vs regular scope

What is the difference between a regular scope and super scope?

I used to run two separate scopes in my DHCP server here (because I had 2 physical networks).


At work, we run a superscope (172.25.22.0 network and 172.25.42.0 network).

What is the difference between the two? And what advantage would I have running a superscope?
THanks
dissolvedAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

DVation191Commented:
dissolved,
A superscope is a collection of individual scopes that can be managed as a single administrative unit. That's what the book says, so it must make sense, right? Well if that doesn't make much sense to you, join the club. Let's see if we can shed some light on what superscopes are and what they can be used for.

A superscope is actually a collection of individual scopes. When you group different scopes together into a single superscope, you can do the following:

1. Place DHCP clients from multiple network IDs on the same physical segment
2. Allow remote DCHP clients from multiple network IDs to obtain an address from a DHCP Server
3. Place multiple DHCP Servers on the same physical segment, with each DCHP Server being responsible for a different scope.
http://www.cramsession.com/articles/files/dhcp-server-superscopes-9172003-0848.asp

hope this helps.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
dissolvedAuthor Commented:
Thanks man. So I guess the purpose of superscope is to ease up on administration efforts. Centralizes all your scopes I guess.   I guess you can accomplish the same thing with SEPARATE scopes (wihtout using superscopes)?

Thanks
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Networking

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.

Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.