A few questions on frame

Can someone verify these 3 statements ?
-If you are using inverse arp, you must use the "frame-relay interface dlci" command?

-if you are using static mapping, the "frame-relay map ip" will be used?

-If you autosense the LMI, it can find out the DLCIs for you. Otherwise, you have to do a "frame-relay interface dlci" command

Some questions:

1. Are subinterfaces ever used in Full Mesh environments?
2. I know autosense LMI can be used in full mesh, but what about partial mesh?

thanks
dissolvedAsked:
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lrmooreCommented:
>-If you are using inverse arp, you must use the "frame-relay interface dlci" command?
if you are NOT using inverse arp.....

>-If you autosense the LMI, it can find out the DLCIs for you. Otherwise, you have to do a "frame-relay interface dlci" command
Yes, you will recognize the DLCI's, whether or not you autosense the LMI, but it will not automatically assign the DLCI's to the appropriate sub-interface. If you have a T1 with multiple DLCI's, and your design calls for multiple sub-interfaces, then you must still manually assign the appropriate DLCI to the appropriate sub-if.

1. Yes, they are. Each site will have multiple sub-interfaces.
2. Of course. The LMI is only between the router and the upstream telco frame switch. By itself, LMI is irrelevant to the DLCI's or whether or not you set up point-to-multipoint, or point-to-point using subinterfaces..
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dissolvedAuthor Commented:
thanks
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lrmooreCommented:
>-if you are using static mapping, the "frame-relay map ip" will be used?
Not necessarily. If you consider assigning the "frame-relay interface dlci" command as "static mapping", then your other alternative is to use the "frame-relay map ip"

Bottom line - you MUST know the DLCI's, and which site each one is mapped to, whether you use sub-interfaces and interface-dlci, or "map ip"..

Advantages:
  frame-relay map ip - often point-to-multipoint
Well, I can't really think of any advantages..

  frame-relay interface-dlci xxx
Assigned to a subinterface, if the dlci drops at the telco, then the interface drops and you have a trap event that you can do something with. With the map ip option, if the dlci drops out, the only indication is a remote will stop responding, with no corresponding trap event happening on the router..
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dissolvedAuthor Commented:
So the frame-relay interface dlci  is really a static way to MAP a DLCI?

Other question:

With partial (aka point to point?) meshed Frame networks, you do not need to use static maps or Inverse ARP. This is because there is only one place for the data to go......the other end of the point to point link?
thanks
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lrmooreCommented:
Regardless of how you set things up, you have a PVC that is point-to-point. Each PVC has a DLCI assigned to each end that each router needs to understand. There is only one place for the other end of the DLCI to end up.
Remember that the DLCI is a L2 connection, so both ends have to see it before you can route L3 over it.
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