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Access 97 memory could not be read

We have an Access 97 db that has run successfully for a number of years on a number of PC's.  Recently however a problem has occurred when running it on one PC (all others are fine).  When trying to run a report the following appears:

"The instruction at "0x77f580c9" referenced memory at '0x000001'.  The memory could not be read"

(The memory references aren't always the same)

Clicking OK then closes the program.  If you then open it and try again occasionally the report runs ok but more often than not the program closes instantly without the message.

So far I have tried the following to resolve the problem without success:

a. Compact and repair db
b. Decompile the db
c. Uninstall and reinstall Access.

The pc is experiencing no other problems so my feeling is that it is not a physical problem with the memory modules.

Any suggestions gratefully received

Ken
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kenabbott
Asked:
kenabbott
1 Solution
 
Steve BinkCommented:
This problem can come from a variety of sources, including but not limited to:

 - Internal Access error (not likely, since other PCs are fine)
 - Corrupt Access/Office installation
 - Fragmentation
 - Hard drive integrity loss
 - Failing memory

The key to your problem is that the other PCs run the report fine.  That leads me to believe your problem is not with the Access application itself.  Your hard drive could be severely fragmented, which can result in data loss over time.  This can also cause a corruption of the Access installation.  If your hard drive is failing on a physical level, you could also see this error, though it is more likely to affect more than just Access.

Just because your PC is not currently exhibiting other symptoms does not mean everything is OK under the case.  Failing memory can cause a variety of problems, and they almost always point you in another direction.  For example, I had a problem with one piece of memory a few years ago.  Files began to be corrupted on my hard drive, apps wouldn't work, etc.  I replaced the drive twice, the motherboard (thinking of the IDE channel), and went through 3 different power supplies.  Memory failures are not reported through Windows...they only show up as unexplained symptoms of a problem.
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